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Daily Archives: March 26, 2012

What we learn from Lauren Collins’ piece on The Daily Mail (“The newspaper that rules Britain”) in this week’s New Yorker:

* The Mail sees itself as the defender of traditional British values. Its detractors call it the Hate Mail or the Daily Fail. It’s considered the most powerful newspaper in Great Britain, with a daily readership of 4.5 million.

* “The Mail’s closest analogue in the American media is perhaps Fox News,” writes Collins. “In Britain, unlike in the United States, television tends to be a dignified affair, while print is berserk and shouty.”

* Editor Paul Dacre believes American newspapers “forgot that there’s a huge market out there of people who are serious-minded but also want some fun in their reading.”

* “The Mail takes a skeptical view of celebrities. It covers them, maximally, but often its stories are about their fading looks, their failing marriages, their hypocrisy, their illegitimate children.”

* Mail Online brought in $25 million last year — up 65% from the year before — but it still isn’t profitable because of expansion investments.

* Mail Online editor Martin Clarke contends his site adheres to fair-use rules. (It’s often accused of lifting others’ work.) “We never like to follow a story without improving it, with either new facts, graphics, pictures, or video.” Clarke says the site will soon be introducing features “that will allow us to link easily and prominently to other sites when further recognition of source material is needed.”

* How the Daily Mail conquered England