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Daily Archives: June 8, 2012


“The Watergate that we wrote about in The Washington Post from 1972 to 1974 is not Watergate as we know it today,” write Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. “It was only a glimpse into something far worse. By the time he was forced to resign, Nixon had turned his White House, to a remarkable extent, into a criminal enterprise.”

The Washington Post points out that this is the first time in 36 years that the two men have shared a byline.

* Woodstein: Nixon was far worse than we thought (Washington Post)
* Downie: Investigative journalism at risk 40 years after Watergate (Washington Post)

* You can spend $45 to go see Nickelback or…. (Boise Weekly)
* Of course, this goes right to my Pinterest page of amusing news items

UPDATE: Josh Gross, who wrote the item, tells Romenesko readers: “Between emails, posts on my Facebook walls, and Twitter messages, there were well over 200 responses [to the snarky concert preview]. The most notable of them just got posted on the BW blog.

“My personal fave is the one that insinuates the author would have taken my lunch money in school.”

Here’s that unedited email:

Wow…you’re seriosly a douche. It’s easy to talk shit in an article huh? Sit back behind the pen? Nickelback gets more pussy in an hour than you will get in a lifetime. Unless your freakin Jimi Hendrix then who the heck are you to judge anyone’s talent? Psychologically speaking…I can say with confidence that you ARE the quintessential “loser” kid from high school who still hates the “popular” kids and blames them for all of your loser whoas as an adult. No wonder you ended up a “journaist”. Happens everytime. Your all the same. I would have taken your lunch money in school…everyday…just saying. Hey…great job being a “journalist”.

* The best responses to the Nickelback kerfuffle (Boise Weekly)

The Big Lead’s Jason McIntyre points out that the Mets’ 13th round draft pick “curiously was the subject of a lengthy feature” on MLB.com and wondered if it’s because the young man, Matt Bowman, is the nephew of MLB Advanced Media CEO Bob Bowman? “In the MLB.com story, there’s no mention of Bob,” notes McIntyre.

Matt Bowman

I asked MLB.com for comment and here’s what editor-in-chief Dinn Mann tells Romenesko readers: “We had 217 articles on our site that day and this was just one. We had content about hundreds of draft picks. In this situation, we had a kid get drafted out of the Ivy League, the first Princeton player drafted by the Mets, and I found that compelling.”

He adds: “Bob [Bowman] knew nothing about the assignment. …There was no directive to the reporter to remove Bob’s name. I removed it. I didn’t see any connection with him being drafted.” Mann also said he didn’t want to give the impression that young Bowman was drafted because of his uncle’s MLB position and added that the so-called “lengthy” feature story was eight paragraphs long. (The piece needed at least a parenthetical disclosure, I think. There are a lot of sports-media critics out there, and MLB.com should have expected this to go public.)

* It’s good to have family members in high places, media version (The Big Lead)

* Dan Barry on why Hollywood has never tried too hard to convey a typical reporter’s work life. (New York Times)
* The Tennessean farms out health care section to hospital flacks. (Nashville Scene)
* Gannett’s Clarion-Ledger is looking for a columnist who’ll work for free. (Columnists.com)
* New AP chief Gary Pruitt leaves Sacramento and McClatchy behind, buys $4.3 million Tribeca condo. (New York Observer)
* Reactions to “Things Journalists Do on Twitter That We Despise.” (Storify)
* Newsweek/Daily Beast chief digital officer Daniel Blackman ousted after a little over a year on the job. (Adweek.com)
* NYC teachers at Washington Post Co.’s Kaplan unit vote for representation by Newspaper Guild of New York. (Guild release)
* Should “link-bloggers” be considered journalists? (Comic Riffs)

A New York Daily News spokesperson sent this apology to the Latino Rebels website for using a Cuban flag on its Puerto Rican Day Parade promo:

As the presenting media sponsor, the Daily News apologizes to the Puerto Rican, Cuban and other Latino communities as well as parade sponsors who were offended by our honest mistake. It will be rectified in tomorrow’s paper.

* Celebrating Puerto Rican Day parade, NYDN unfurls Cuban flag (NYTimes.com)

“Car Talk” guys Tom and Ray Magliozzi (aka Click and Clack) will stop recording new programs in the fall, but their weekly show will continue to be distributed by NPR, using material from the show archives. (The show debuted on NPR in fall of 1987.)

“My brother has always been ‘work-averse,’” says Ray, 63. “Now, apparently, even the one hour a week is killing him!”

“It’s brutal!” adds Tom, 74.

Read Tom and Ray’s note to listeners. The press release is after the jump. Read More

Claire Atkinson in New York Post, June 5: “Tribune Co. owners are again casting around for candidates to lead the troubled media outfit, which has been in Chapter 11 for more than three years. Former NBCUniversal boss Jeff Zucker is a leading candidate to run the debt-plagued newspaper and TV station company, sources said.”

Claire Atkinson in the New York Post, June 8: “Several news business high-ups say one name being floated internally to come in and revive CNN ratings is Jeff Zucker, the former NBCUniversal boss. Zucker is friendly with both Bewkes and corporate adviser, Gary Ginsberg.”

* Jeff Zucker a top candidate for Tribune CEO job (New York Post)
* Jeff Zucker mentioned as candidate for CNN job (New York Post)

Veteran U-T San Diego sports columnist Tim Sullivan was fired last Friday, simply told his services were no longer required. There was angry reaction to his ouster, and now Sullivan tweets that paper tells him he’s been “on vacation.”

I’m trying to find out more.

Meanwhile, U-T San Diego’s CEO and editor are meeting with the sports staff next Wednesday. The memo:

Fireside Chat with John Lynch and Jeff Light – SPORTS
When: Wednesday, June 13, 2012 4:00 PM-5:00 PM
Where: Conf Room – 5th Floor Manchester Boardroom

These sessions are a chance to help the newsroom get up to speed on changes inside the company, to exchange ideas with John and to help build a common vision of our future.
It’s an open forum but we do have two main points we want to cover:

· We expect all of our employees to be advocates for our company and enthusiasts for change.
· We expect our journalists to always act with independence, integrity and fairness.

Earlier JimRomenesko.com stories:
* U-T San Diego fires veteran sports columnist Tim Sullivan
* Sullivan questioned new initiatives, but “I wasn’t told my job was in danger”

The Ralph Brennan Restaurant Group says 20% of the proceeds from each $8 Save the Picayune drink will go to “adversely effected” Times-Picayune employees.

A restaurant vice president tells the Times-Picayune’s Brett Anderson that the drinks will be offered “every day, not just 3 days a week” — a reference to the paper’s new printing schedule, of course — and that one cocktail name that was rejected was News You Can Booze.

* Save the Picayune cocktails coming to 5 restaurants (noladefender.com)
* Ralph Brennan’s restaurants putting booze in the news (Times-Picayune)
* Editor of New Orleans’ alt-weekly talks about Times-Picayune’s troubles (Capital New York)

The Boston Globe’s Mary Carmichael points out that journalist Fareed Zakaria gave essentially the same speeches at 2012 Harvard and Duke graduation ceremonies. His defense:

Those are students from two very similar institutions graduating within two weeks of each other. I don’t see how I could have come up with two completely different speeches without giving one group a second-rate talk. I’d rather come up with the same important message I think they need to hear.

The Time columnist/CNN talker pointed out that many other commencement speakers recycle their own material. “That is true,” writes Carmichael. “Governor Deval Patrick spoke at six commencements in 2009; they overlapped so much that some students listened with homemade Bingo cards in hand.”

* Fareed Zakaria’s speeches strike a similar tone (Boston Globe)