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Daily Archives: June 22, 2012

The New York Daily News has warned me — and others too, I assume — about posting its photograph of Alec Baldwin going after a News photographer outside of the Marriage License Bureau.

News attorney Tamara Whitehouse warns in a cease and desist email received this afternoon that my use of the photo “is unauthorized, and is in violation of the Copyright Act.”

She continues:

Although this use is unauthorized, if you would like to use a Daily News photograph of this incident, we will allow you to use the attached watermarked photograph at no charge. The attached photograph is the only photograph you may use. As a condition of publishing or broadcasting the attached photograph, you must not alter the photograph in any way, must link back to the following article on the Daily News website, and must credit the Daily News as “The New York Daily News.” No social media uses of this photograph are permitted. …

Please confirm by email when you have complied with the terms of this letter.

I’ve just confirmed it, Ms. Whitehouse. Matter settled? (I won’t get in trouble for posting the above image, right?) And just out of curiosity, did you get ABC’s permission to post these photos? Or did you do as I did with your photo, which is give credit?

Read her CEASE AND DESIST FROM COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT email after the jump.

Read More

Greg Jaffe

Washington Post Pentagon reporter Greg Jaffe is joining the National desk’s enterprise team. A staff memo says:

Since joining The Washington Post in 2009, Greg has produced vivid, often heartbreaking accounts of war and the costs that it inflicts on those at home. Under the guidance of National enterprise editor David Finkel and other editors, we expect Greg to take on a broad range of subjects as he crafts the intimate journalism that is one of The Post’s hallmarks.

The paper is now looking for “a nimble and aggressive reporter to follow in Greg’s footsteps on the military beat, one of the toughest and most rewarding in Washington.”

The full memo is after the jump. Read More

Unfortunate ad placement

* Rumors swirl about LeBron James having six toes on one foot (TheScore.com)
* Evidence in favor — and against — James having six toes on right foot (SBNation.com)
* Nail fungus ad mars historic Sun-Sentinel front page (ShermanReport.com)

Oops — this might cost him an endorsement!

A letter to the editor in the St. John’s Review signed by Portland mayoral candidate Charlie Hales (right) contains passages lifted from a 2009 Oregonian story. Reporter Casey Parks writes:

The passages made it appear Hales had taken a recent tour of St. Johns, but the description of scenes and dialogue came from a reporter who took the tour three years ago. It did not include Hales.

The candidate blames the plagiarism on a campaign volunteer. “This was something that somebody here wrote that I signed,” he tells the reporter.

Another Oregonian reporter congratulated Parks on her story this morning and asked how she learned the paragraphs were lifted. She wrote her colleague in an email that was forwarded to me:

I read Charlie’s letter to the editor and thought it would be a good story to write about his wanting to reopen the precinct. So I pulled all of our old North Precinct clips and saw the story that Lisa [Grace Lednicer] had written. I thought it was weird that both tours included seeing [a police officer named] Sarah 20 minutes into it, so I called the guy who gave the tour, went and met him and started asking questions.

Meanwhile, former Oregonian reporter Lednicer writes on her Facebook wall: “Lesson from today’s front-page story in the Oregonian: Even though I’ve left the newspaper, my writing is still good enough to swipe.”

* Letter to the editor signed by mayoral candidate uses passages from the Oregonian (oregonlive.com)
* Mayoral candidate’s letter to the St. John’s Review (St. John’s Review)
* From 2009: Police precinct consolidation worries Portland residents (oregonlive.com)

New York Times associate managing editor Jim Schachter has been named WNYC radio vice president for news — a newly created position. “He will oversee its strategic vision and planning, as well as editorial decisions related to production and operations,” says a release.

Here’s Times executive editor Jill Abramson’s memo on Schachter’s departure:

Jim should be perfectly suited for that new position at our city’s premier public radio station After all, he’s spent much of his 17 years here tackling new missions, always with aplomb, entrepreneurship and humor.

Jim Schachter

Jim joined us from The Los Angeles Times as a backfielder in Bizday. He later became Sunday Business editor and then one of the department’s deputies. He held deputy roles as well in culture and the magazine. One hallmark of each stop was his enthusiasm for new features and ideas, then energizing a staff behind them and insuring that the work was of the highest quality.

He continued to do that when he moved to the masthead. Among his many projects, he helped launch India Ink, SchoolBook, the Local and our regional pages and partnerships with news groups in Texas, Chicago and San Francisco.

We’ll miss him and if you’re able to, join us when we tell him so on Thursday, June 28, at 5:30 in the Page One conference room.

Jill

The WNYC release is after the jump. Read More

Warren Buffett’s Omaha World-Herald Co. is buying the Waco Tribune-Herald for an undisclosed price from Robinson Media. (Here’s that paper’s story on the deal.) Chairman Clifton Robinson says his family “endeavors to always engage in win-win situations, and this announcement will prove to be a premier shining example.” The deal closes July 31.

* Warren Buffett adds Waco to growing newspaper network (Omaha World-Herald)

Michael Calderone’s Huffington magazine piece on Politico is out — it describes the newsroom’s “stressful, hamster wheel environment” and star system, among other things — but you have to pay for the iPad app. If you don’t want to part with 99 cents, Joe Pompeo has the best “morsels” and The Atlantic Wire’s Eric Randall shares his favorite passage from “Inside the Cult: Politico at a Crossroads”:

Politico staffers routinely talk of a Politico “star-system” in which a handful of reporters in the VandeHarris orbit receive preferential treatment from company leadership, while the majority are left drifting in a far off journalistic galaxy. One former staffer likens the newsroom to The Hunger Games, in which young people fight to the death for the enjoyment of a privileged class.

UPDATE: I just bought the app. Here’s more from the piece:

Having built a sizable and still-expanding newsroom of 225 editorial and business staffers, Politico has to size up new revenue streams and reshape the franchise in such a way that staffers speculate the company’s co-founders [John Harris and Jim VandeHei] may not stick around a few years from now.

Calderone, a former Politico media reporter, says the two “worry about Politico’s future with a post-Depression sense of paranoia” and that “even when times are flush, there’s a gnawing fear that the bottom could drop out at any moment.”

Calderone reports Politico’s traffic during the first five months of 2012 is down, from an average of 4.229 million unique visitors in 2011 to 4.165 million so far this year — numbers that suggest “Politico has captured just about as big an audience as it can for its unique brand of non-stop political news.

VandeHei noted that Politico is geared toward a niche audience and doesn’t have to continuously grow traffic as do more general interest sites that don’t command premium ad rates.

Politico has long had trouble retaining talent in its newsroom, where staffers either thrive or barely survive in a male-dominated, hard-driving environment defined by frantic 5 a.m. emails from editors and weekend assignments. There have been so many departures lately that Politico editors have done away with the traditional going-away cake in the newsroom, which staffers jokingly call the “awkward cake” given what they describe as Harris’ sometimes clumsy send-offs.

UPDATE II: I invited John Harris to comment on Calderone’s piece. He responded: “Thanks, Jim. I have not read it yet but will. I expect we’ll probably pass on extending a comment but I appreciate your offer.”

* Politico’s newsroom is “The Hunger Games” (The Atlantic Wire)
* Politico is at an editorial crossroads (Capital New York)
* Buy the latest issue of Huffington magazine at the iTunes store (apple.com)
* March 2010: Michael Calderone leaves Politico as mini-exodus continues (Huffington Post)

Jake Wagman, who leaves the Post-Dispatch after nine years, says his new firm, Shield Political Research, “will offer a fresh and innovative approach to opposition research for candidates and campaigns” by “using public documents and the tools of investigative reporting to produce original research.”

He writes:

I’ll always be bullish on newspapers in general, and the Post-Dispatch in particular, but over the last several years — while shining a light on lawmaker perks, reporting on government waste and peering into the backgrounds of countless individuals running for office— I realized my passion was holding candidates and public officials accountable.

I also realized that the state of the media industry means many newsrooms no longer have the resources they need to thoroughly scrutinize those seeking public office.

Wagman’s farewell letter to the Post-Dispatch staff is after the jump. Read More

Politico reporter Joe Williams went on Martin Bashir’s MSNBC show on Thursday and, according to Breitbart.com, “all but called Mitt Romney a racist.” The site posted several of Williams’ tweets, including the one below. (His Twitter account is now protected.)

“This is our MSM,” Breitbart.com’s John Nolte wrote on his post about Williams. “This is Politico. This is why God created Andrew Breitbart.”

Politico reported early this morning that Williams has been suspended for “suggesting Mitt Romney was only comfortable around white people.” A memo from Politico editors John Harris and Jim VandeHei says of Williams:

Joe Williams

His comment about Governor Romney earlier today on MSNBC fell short of our standards for fairness and judgment in an especially unfortunate way.

Joe has acknowledged that his appearance reflected a poor choice of words. This appearance came in the context of other remarks on Twitter that, cumulatively, require us to make clear that our standards are serious, and so are the consequences for disregarding them. This is true for all POLITICO journalists, including an experienced and well-respected voice like Joe Williams.”

Following discussion of this matter with editors, Joe has been suspended while we review the matter.

The editor’s memo added that “Politico journalists have a clear and inflexible responsibility to cover politics fairly and free of partisan bias.”

One conservative site’s reaction to the news: “The suspension is a revelation. I mean, who knew there were standards at Politico of all places?”

* Politico reporter Joe Williams suspended for comments (Politico.com)
* Politico reporter says Romney only comfortable with whites (Breitbart.com)