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Daily Archives: July 5, 2012

An American Legion district baseball president and team manager was suspended after he gave the Scranton Times-Tribune the box score of a game that was never played because one team didn’t have enough players. Using information it received from Jeff Kovaleski, the Times-Tribune reported in Sunday’s papers that Dickson City beat Moscow 1-0 and that pitcher Adam Sosnowski only allowed two hits.

“Justin King had two hits and drove in Sosnowski for the game’s only run in the third inning,” the paper reported.

Kovaleski says he gave the bogus results to the newspaper because he wanted to spare Moscow players the embarrassment of taking a forfeit. “I didn’t intend to hurt anybody, the newspaper or the league,” he tells the Scranton paper. “Being the president of the league, I did not want to embarrass anyone or hurt any kid’s feelings. I am very remorseful about doing it.”

* Fake box score reported to newspaper leads to suspension of manager (Scranton Times-Tribune)
* Here are the highlights and box score for a game that was never played
* On my Facebook wall, Henry Kisor tells the story of Ignoto, the unknown referee

Rupert Murdoch said last week that he’s thinking about changing the name of the Wall Street Journal to simply WSJ. He isn’t the first one to consider a name change. “In 1946, a Princeton, N.J., polling firm concluded that that name was a handicap to the newspaper’s growth,” writes Christine Haughney.

Names that were considered at the time included: World’s Work, The North American Journal, Business Day, The National Journal, and Financial America.

“When [editor] Barney Kilgore had completely unfettered control, he dropped the idea of changing the name of The Journal,” says former Wall Street Journal assistant publisher Richard Tofel. “It wasn’t his idea. It was his boss’s bad idea.”

* Murdoch isn’t the first to consider renaming Wall Street Journal (NYTimes.com)

A Romenesko reader from the Raleigh area writes:

I was interested (and, admittedly, pretty steamed) to see a blurb hidden on 2A of today’s News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.) announcing that on Thursday, July 26 the paper will publish an Olympics preview, and Thursday subscribers will be charged a dollar for it — whether they like it or not. No instructions on how to opt out, no explanation of why there’s an extra charge for something the paper’s always included in its regular price previously.

I’ve invited executive editor John Drescher to respond.

I recall being scolded in 2005 by a Washington Post reporter after I linked to a summer intern’s column about failing to get a Spin internship. Krystal Grow assumed she was “a shoo in” for the job — and was so confident about it that she went apartment hunting in New York — but then was turned down. Grow wrote that she “went home and cried until I passed out, then woke up and cried some more.”

Others joined the WaPo reporter in calling me cruel, but Grow told Alex Heard that the link and discussion about her on my site was “exciting but terrifying.”

* Think twice before dissing your colleagues on Twitter (JimRomenesko.com)
* Internship rejection column creates national stir (studentpress.org)
* Krystal Mess: The story of an overeager young journalist (Slate)

Pulitzer-winning Times-Picayune outdoors editor Bob Marshall tells Facebook friends and subscribers that he rejected a job offer from NOLA Media Group. He was in Italy when it was announced in May that the paper was cutting staff and its print publishing schedule.

Getting the news of the death of the that institution and all the tumult that decision unleased on the lives of life-long colleagues would have been a tough emotional wallop to absorb had I been in town as the events unfolded. But getting the painful details in drips and drabs seven times zones away was slow-motion torture, like scanning the casualty list at a disaster searching for the names of loved ones.

* “I turned down the job offer from NOLA Media Group” (Facebook)
* May 13, 2012: Bob Marshall honored by Loyola University (nola.com)

Amanda Zamora leaves the Washington Post after seven years to become senior engagement editor at ProPublica. “At ProPublica she will be in charge of expanding social media, crowd-sourcing and distributed reporting efforts,” says the Post memo announcing her departure. Zamora, who leaves the Post on July 20, is currently National digital editor. She started in the paper’s Austin bureau.

Read ProPublica’s release. The Post memo is after the jump. Read More

Political reporter Ginger Gibson left the Star-Ledger last November and joined Politico, where she’s now covering the Romney campaign. But the Newark newspaper wants her back.

NJ.com chief content officer Lamar Graham — remember his “I’m hiring!” Facebook post that was pulled after it was posted here? — recently sent this email to Gibson:

From: Lamar Graham
Sent: Friday, June 29, 2012 5:25 PM
To: Ginger Gibson
Subject: Job opportunity at NJ.com

Ginger Gibson (source: @gingergibson)

Hi, Ginger. I’m Lamar Graham, the new content boss at NJ.com. We’re planning a big and rapid expansion of our original coverage across New Jersey, including politics, in the very near future, and [Star-Ledger editor] Kevin Whitmer suggested we reach out to you. I’m looking for a top-flight political reporter – someone who knows NJ politics intimately, who has great reporting chops, who writes with intelligence and style, and who really gets and likes digital (including social media). Kevin says you’re the whole package. For the time being, this new hire would focus almost exclusively on Chris Christie – stick to him like glue, post about him multiple times daily, travel with him a good deal of the time, really capture him as a political figure and NJ personality. Later on, the role might broaden. Bottom line: I think there’s a real opportunity here to be an agenda-setter and a star. Interested in talking? I’m looking to move quickly. You can reach me via email or at either of the numbers below. Look forward to chatting. Best, LG

Gibson, who did not send me this email, tells Romenesko readers: “I’m very happy with my job at Politico. I’m not considering returning to The Star-Ledger or NJ.com.”

* Graham says he didn’t realize his Facebook post was public (NYTimes.com)

Freelance writer and Wall Street Journal extreme-sports correspondent Michael Ybarra, 45, was killed in a fall during a weekend mountain-climbing trip in the Sierra Nevada. Authorities were alerted on Monday when Ybarra failed to return from his trip on Sunday. His body was found on Wednesday.

The Journal put out this statement Wednesday night:

Michael J. Ybarra

Michael Ybarra was an extraordinary journalist. In the best traditions of his profession he enlightened and engaged readers on a wide array of topics in clear, vivid prose. His passion for the outdoors was evident not only in his writing for the Leisure & Arts and Books sections — reviews and essays written with such verve you felt you were right beside him on a mountain face or in a kayak — but in the way he lived. We mourn his passing, and send our thoughts and prayers to his family.

* Writer and climber Michael Ybarra is killed near Yosemite (WSJ.com)