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Daily Archives: August 7, 2012

Jason Vincent

Fox 21 (Duluth) news director Jason Vincent wrote on his Facebook page last Wednesday: “Add drunk, homeless, Native American man to the list of animals that have wandered into my yard … Then he proceed [sic] to wave at me and give me the peace sign when he spotted me in the window. Wow …”

Vincent and his station apologized after the status update started circulating on social media, but the controversy didn’t die down and Fox 21 general manager Jackie Bruenjes announced Monday night that Vincent resigned.

“Jason has elected to take a new job assignment,” her statement said; it didn’t disclose the new position.

* Fox 21 news director resigns over Facebook flap (Duluth News Tribune)
* Earlier: TV news director criticized over Facebook post (Duluth News Tribune)
* Protesters: “Hey, hey, ho, ho, Jason Vincent’s got to go!” (WDIO.com)

Akron Beacon Journal columnist Bob Dyer didn’t like that “arsehole of America” crack — and he let Sports Illustrated and Wall Street Journal contributor Stephanie Wei know.

I approached her in the Firestone Country Club media building on Sunday, where she was pecking away on her laptop.

I held up my cell phone, displaying the tweet in question. She looked as if she been nailed in the back with an errant tee-shot.

I turned on my tape recorder.

“It was just a joke,” she said. …

After I confronted her, Wei issued the following tweet:

* Bob Dyer to Stephanie Wie: “Nice mouth. Nice attitude” (ohio.com) || Follow Wei on Twitter

Letter to Romenesko

From MICHAEL BUCK: Subject — encrypted police radios. I’m a former police reporter for this paper [The Express-Times] and often wondered what would happen if police did what they have just done in Allentown, Pa.: switch to encrypted radio communications. I know this has happened elsewhere. What are other outlets doing? Begging cops for the code or coming up with new ways of monitoring them? What do your readers have to say?

* Allentown Police Department switches to encrypted radios; communications will not be publicly accessible

The New Yorker says its iPhone app “has every story, every cartoon, everything in the print edition and more, delivered each Monday to your mobile device.”

This week’s issue is a free download. Starting next week, individual issues are $5.99 and subscriptions are $59.99 per year. Current print, iPad, and Kindle Fire subscribers will receive full access to the app.

The release is after the jump. Read More

* New ABC report names the top 25 consumer magazine for the first half of 2012. (AARP The Magazine is #1 in total paid circulation.) (Audit Bureau of Circulations)
* Single-copy magazine sales are down 9.6% over the first half of 2011. (paidContent.org)

Pay for them, dammit!

* “Get a life,” U-T San Diego’s CEO tells reporter when asked about paper’s car museum and construction permits. (voiceofsandiego.com)
* You’ve been warned! “To the person who is stealing these papers, when I catch you I will call police.” (@EliseOnDeadline)
* Survey: 40.7% of newspaper editors say they spend more time monitoring other media than they did three years ago. (ebyline.biz)
* Mediabistro parent acquires Lost Remote, founded 13 years ago by Cory Bergman. (LostRemote.com)
* Eight in ten are following the Olympics on TV or digitally. (people-press.org)
* Olympics give “Today” show a big lift, just when it needed one. (New York Times)
* Mat Honan: How Apple and Amazon security flaws led to my epic hacking. (Wired.com)
* Chicago Tribune cuts back on its stage show series, which it once called a “new journalism platform.” (Time Out Chicago)
* Why Turner Broadcasting bought Bleacher Report. (AdAge.com)
* Another account of New York Observer editor and president’s departures. (Capital New York)