Archive

Daily Archives: August 15, 2012

* Michael Massing: The press writes endlessly about the Internet, but fails to examine some important questions about it. (CJR.org)
* Washington Post apologizes to Fareed Zakaria for its story about the way quotes were handled in his 2008 book. (washingtonpost.com)
* Is Mark Thompson what the New York Times really needs now? (gigaom.com)
* You can now read eight Foliomag.com stories a month before the meter kicks in. (Foliomag.com)
* Pablo Eisenberg: Washington Post shouldn’t have to ask the Ford Foundation for money. (philanthropy.com)
* Newspapers say USPS plan to offer discounts to direct marketing firm is unfair. (AP via Yahoo)
* Making up a Bob Dylan quote isn’t a real scandal? (redeyechicago.com)

* Baggarly on July 28: “I feel it’s important that I issue a public apology to Melky Cabrera for giving greater voice to a rumor that, to the best of my knowledge and on his word, has absolutely no basis in fact.” (Here’s the tweet that prompted the apology.)

* The news today: Cabrera suspended 50 games for positive testosterone test.

The Las Vegas Review-Journal told staffers Tuesday that it’s laying off five editors and its art director.

I’ve confirmed that these journalists are leaving the paper (for now):

Mary Hynes — city editor
Frank Fertado — features editor
Joe Hawk — sports editor
Jim Wright — business editor
Ched Whitney — art director
Charlie Zobell — managing editor

In a restructuring, the paper is hiring one person to oversee news/business and another for features/sports and, I’m told, the above editors have been invited to apply for the positions.

I have left a message for editor Mike Hengel. His secretary says he’s in meetings.

* Shake-up could shed a century of institutional knowledge at Las Vegas Review-Journal (4TH ST8)

The Oregonian reveals in the ninth paragraph of a Romney/Ryan editorial:

This year, The Oregonian will not be endorsing a candidate for president. The access and close observation that inform our endorsements for state and local offices and Congress do not apply in a national race; our CNN-level view of the presidential race is similar to everyone else’s.

Here’s what Portland’s alt-weekly has to say about that:

Insiders say Publisher N. Christian Anderson III didn’t want the paper to endorse President Obama, as it did in 2008 before Anderson became publisher. Endorsing Republican Mitt Romney could reprise the backlash from liberal Portland that the paper faced in 2000, when it endorsed George W. Bush. Anderson says those explanations are wrong.

He tells WW [Willamette Week] he wants The O’s editorial and commentary to be more local. And he adds, “I’m convinced there aren’t any readers waiting with bated breath for a top-of-the-mountain proclamation from The Oregonian telling them how to vote in the presidential race in November.”

* Romney, Ryan offer ticket for a clearly defined contest (Oregonian)
* The O won’t endorse a candidate for president (wweek.com)

The Unification Church says 93-year-old Washington Times founder Rev. Sun Myung Moon is in intensive care “due to complications that arose from an untimely cold and pneumonia.” A letter to church members says Moon “was pushing his limits in carrying out his schedule at this time” but “he is being treated at one of the top medical institutions in Korea and is under the care of its medical team who are doing their best for True Father’s speedy recovery.”

From: District 1 Office
Date: Wed, Aug 15, 2012 at 12:27 AM
Subject: [WDC-List] [HQ Memo] International President’s Letter to the Unification Family Worldwide
To:

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

May the love and blessings of our Heavenly Parent and our True Parents be with you and your families.

Attached is an important message from our International President, Dr. Hyung Jin Moon, regarding the current health condition of our True Father. Please share it with your families and other Brothers and Sisters.

Let us unite as a nation in offering our jeongseong and sincere prayer for our True Father’s health during this critical time.

Sincerely

Rev. Joshua Cotter
Executive Vice President
Unification Church USA

A former Milwaukee Newspaper Guild board member sent this email to Milwaukee Journal Sentinel staffers on Tuesday:

Does anyone have thoughts on what, if anything the Guild, ought to be doing to prepare for a possible sale of the paper? I’m not trying to scare anyone, but there was talk about this yesterday after news broke that the [newspaper founder's] family sold all of their stock. This follows the filing a couple of weeks ago in which one of the company’s largest stock holders, Gabelli & Co, said Journal Communication should sell the newspaper to Warren Buffett or someone else with deep pockets.


Former Milwaukee Magazine editor and onetime Journal Sentinel reporter Bruce Murphy says a sale of the Pulitzer-winning (2008, 2010 and 2011) daily “could be imminent.” One reason: the stock of parent company Journal Communications Inc. has rebounded, going from $2.74 in October to $5.61 today. “If you’re going to sell, now’s the time, as the potential purchase price may be as high as you’ll ever get,” he notes.

The idea of Warren Buffet as savior is attractive because he would be less likely to slash payroll. If a newspaper chain, by contrast, were to buy the paper, the triage would be ugly; the latter-day era of the Journal Sentinel as a Pulitzer Prize-winning publication would come to an inglorious end.

* Is the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel for sale? (urbanmilwaukee.com)
* Does this week’s Journal news portend a sale of the company? (milwaukeemag.com)
* July 26: Journal Communications profit up despite publishing division’s troubles (AP)

I asked Netflix last week: What are the most popular movies about newspapers?

Company spokesman (and former newspaper reporter) Jonathan Friedland got back to me yesterday with the findings:

We’ve put together two lists – the first of the most popular newspaper movies on DVDs and the second of the most popular newspaper movies on streaming. As you probably know, under the first sale doctrine, once we have a DVD, we have it permanently and can rent it out as often as demanded by members. So, all the listed DVDs are available.

Netflix Top Ten Newspaper Films on DVD

1. State of Play (2009)

2. Zodiac (2007)

3. Citizen Kane (1941)

4. All the President’s Men (1976)

5. The Killing Fields (1984)

6. Shattered Glass (2003)

7. The Pelican Brief (1993)

8. His Girl Friday (1940)

9. Absence of Malice (1981)

10. The Year of Living Dangerously (1982)

In the case of streaming, the availability of movies is governed by Pay TV licensing regimes – which means that films are on our streaming service for varied durations. In the case of some of the streaming films (notably, Pelican Brief and All the President’s Men), they aren’t currently available to watch instantly on our US service.

Netflix Top Ten Newspaper Films on Streaming

1. The Pelican Brief

2. All the President’s Men

3. Absence of Malice

4. His Girl Friday

5. The China Syndrome (1979)

6. The Killing Fields

7. Page One (Inside The New York Times) (2011)

8. The Front Page (1931)

9. The Paper (1994)

10. The Year of Living Dangerously

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* Jonah Lehrer “was and remains on a features contract with Wired,” says magazine spokesman Jon Hammond. “We chose to maintain our contract.” Hammond tells BuzzFeed that Lehrer made “a horrible mistake” in fabricating quotes for his book, but that “does not diminish his work as a valued contributor to the magazine and website” and “we still value the work that he has done for us.” (buzzfeed.com)
* NYT Co. and Mark Thompson pairing “looks like a marriage made in heaven … but it’s also a shotgun wedding.” (thedailybeast.com)
* The Economist’s excuse for its drinking-at-work story error: “We must have been drunk on the job.” (observer.com)
* “What I learned about hyper-local news at Patch and other places.” (whatburnsmybacon.com)
* Magazines make branded content, so why don’t they act more like brands? (AdAge.com)
* Marla Dickerson is named Los Angeles Times business editor. (Los Angeles Times)
* Nielsen survey finds more teens listen to music through YouTube than through radio, CDs and iTunes. (TechCrunch.com)
* An intern’s take on the recent Bleacher Report deal. (Adweek.com)
* Erik Wemple blasts Sarah Palin’s “lazy and tired indictment of the media. (washingtonpost.com)
* Bob Woodward’s “The Price of Politics” will be published by Simon & Schuster on Sept. 11. (nytimes.com)