Archive

Daily Archives: August 20, 2012

* Report: Orange County Register’s new owner wants to hire food and film critics. (ocweekly.com)
* Fareed Zakaria resigns from his Yale post. (nhregister.com)
* “Good Morning America” beats “Today” show — again. (nytimes.com)
* Geneva Overholser on what’s missing from the “rebooting journalism schools” debate. (ojr.org)
* Red and Black alum on the newspaper drama: “All of this is mighty painful” for former staffers. (cjr.org)
* Are media ignoring the Family Research Council shooting? (bloomberg.com)
* Some say Utah TV journalist Chris Vanocur put Mitt Romney on the path to the White House. (cityweekly.net)
* What newspaper visionaries missed: the impact of Web 2.0. (gigom.com)
* Ex-AP journalists want a “napalm girl” correction from NYT. (Media Myth Alert)
* Nieman Watchdog Project is being folded into Nieman Reports. (niemanwatchdog.org)
* What former New York Times reporter Steven Weisman is up to. (newspaperalum.com)
* Stephen Bloom’s back in his j-school office, but he’s not answering questions. (press-citizen.com)

Enter the Haggis, a Toronto-based band, has raised over $57,000 through Kickstarter for an album that’s based entirely on the March 30 edition of the Globe and Mail. (The album comes out on March 30, 2013.)

The Globe and Mail’s front page headline that day was “Harper’s Modest Revolution” and the album’s title is “The Modest Revolution.” The band says on its Kickstarter page that it’s “been scouring the paper, solving crosswords, reading obituaries and pulling together ideas which are evolving into songs.” (Singer Brian Buchanan notes that Earl Scrugg’s obituary ran that day, “so that kind of writes itself.”)

The band explains how it got the music-based-on-newspaper-content idea:

Leafing through a local paper in a small town this past winter, we were struck by the sheer number of interesting story-lines we found. After some discussion, we hit on an unusual idea: why not capture a snapshot of a single day musically?

We knew we needed a newspaper from a major city to ensure that we’d have a wide variety of stories and topics to choose from. No problem there: ETH is from Toronto, which is the biggest and most culturally diverse city in Canada. Crazy stuff happens here every day! We bit the bullet and chose March 30th, 2012 as our “snapshot day” – and we ordered a WHOLE lot of copies of The Globe And Mail. [The March 30, 2012, issues all go to contributors.] This is what 1500 newspapers looks like:

* You want to set the Globe and Mail to music? (theglobeandmail.com)
* Using Kickstarter and the Globe and Mail to promote an album (nowtoronto.com)
* “The Modest Revolution” Kickstarter campaign (kickstarter.com)

UPDATE — ANOTHER KICKSTARTER SUCCESS STORY: A month ago I wrote about Kalamazoo journalist Chris Killian’s modest Kickstarter campaign — an attempt to raise $2,500 to tour the swing states in a VW bus to “get the pulse of the people.”

Killian’s campaign ended four days again and he raised $4,472. His proposal said that “PB&J’s are on the menu” but he’ll now be able to upgrade to steak sandwiches — or an occasional stop at a Days Inn for a shower and bed.

Renee DiResta of the No Upside blog recently asked Google: “Why is [name of state] so ” and let it autocomplete. She got some very interesting results.

I wondered how Google would autocomplete questions about news outlets and media people, so I typed “Why is [name of news organization/journalist]” and let the search engine finish the passage. Here are screenshots of the results:




The Michigan Daily reported earlier in the summer that Michigan Hockey recruit Jacob Trouba might not honor his commitment to play for the school this fall because the Kitchener Rangers presented his family with an offer to play for that Ontario Hockey League team.

Rangers management said the Daily was wrong and that the team “served the newspaper and the writer there to either back it up or retract it” because “our intent is that we will file a statement of claim for damages.”

Last Friday, The Daily issued the “clarification” below and removed the story from its website. (Of course, it’s still cached.)

The Daily clarifies here that, while it was at the time reporting a story of importance to the Michigan sports community, and that its source made the claims reported in the story, if all of the facts had been known to the Daily, including the denials that were not initially reported, and the subsequent OHL investigation that found no violation, the Daily would not have published the story. The Daily has accordingly removed the story from its website.

* A clarification (michigandaily.com)
* The story that prompted the lawsuit threat and was pulled from michigandaily.com
* Earlier: Hockey team wants Michigan Daily to retract story about recruit (jimromenesko.com)


Gawker media writer Hamilton Nolan says TV journalist Campbell Brown — married to Romney advisor Dan Senor — “is quite RESENTFUL that commoners on the Twitter expect her to disclose that she sleeps with a paid Republican Party mouthpiece every time she writes some sort of political column thing.” His advice to her: “Do America a favor and leave journalism for another field” or “if you choose to continue to write things about political issues, simply disclose.”

* Campbell Brown incapable of understanding the concept of disclosure (Gawker)

Letter to Romenesko

From FRED ZIMMERMAN: Where is A.G. Sulzberger these days? I haven’t sent his byline from the Midwest or anywhere else for months. He’s a fine reporter, by the way.

I let the Times publisher’s son know that he’s missed, but I doubt I’ll hear back; young Sulzberger doesn’t have a good record of responding to my emails. Sulzberger left his Kansas City post in the spring to join the Times’ Metro desk. (The reassignment memo said: “Arthur, who has a gift for spotting stories in hidden corners and bringing them to life on the page, will be overseeing a talented team of borough and courthouse reporters.”) It appears his last Times piece was published on May 20.

UPDATE: A.G. Sulzberger sends this email:

Hi Jim, Thanks for your message. Your reader is correct, I left Kansas City several months ago to rejoin the metro desk as an editor. Best, A.G.


* More Jaco: “Mea culpa. I should have challenged Akin on abortion/rape. No excuse.” (@charlesjaco)
* Politico reporter blasted after defending Rep. Todd Akin. (washingtonpost.com)
* Robert Kaiser’s 20-year-old memo about digital media “is a striking document, even today.” (recoveringjournalist.com)
* Why GQ is running a 4,000-word excerpt of the Joe Paterno bio. (wwd.com)
* David Carr: “The now ancient routes to credibility at small magazines and newspapers — toiling in menial jobs while learning the business — have been wiped out.” (nytimes.com)

Darren Rovell

* Darren Rovell explains his jump from CNBC to ESPN. (shermanreport.com)
* HuffPost Live launch has “really gone better than I had hoped,” says exec. (adage.com)
* Obama adviser says People and Entertainment Tonight are “equally important” as the national political press. (washingtonpost.com)
* Time managing editor says Fareed Zakaria will recover from his plagiarism scandal. (nytimes.com)
* University of Georgia Red & Black publisher apologizes for altercation at meeting. (onlineathens.com) | (redanddead.com)
* Miami Herald series exposing “gut-wrenching epidemic of elder abuses and deaths” in Florida wins the 2012 Heywood Broun Award. (newsguild.org)
* Arizona Republic editor’s column about looming paywall “never directly acknowledges prices are going up.”
(gannettblog.blogspot.com)