Morning report

President Obama answered ten questions on Reddit and left 10,000 unanswered. “By any measure, it was a watershed moment for Reddit, whose previous claim to cultural relevance was its role in shutting down SOPA,” writes Matthew Creamer.
* Obama brings down Reddit during Romney’s big week (theverge.com)
* Reddit Q-and-A a smart tactic, but empty of actual content (adage.com)
* The best moments from Obama’s Reddit AMA (adweek.com)

More stories:
* Las Vegas Review-Journal cuts several editor positions in a restructuring. “[Removing] a layer of management will best serve our readers going forward,” says the editor. (lvrj.com)
* NYT public editor on the Dowd/Mazzetti/CIA flap: It’s “a problem of boundaries – the failure to maintain them.” (nytimes.com)
* Larry Cohen, who was recently elected newspaper columnists group president, dies at 64. (columnists.com)
* Joe Posnanski leaves his iPad on a plane and is assured by his daughter that “a nice person will turn it in.” (I won’t reveal the ending.) (JoePosnanski.com)
* Reporter covering the James Brown estate controversy goes up against South Carolina’s attorney general. (free-times.com)
* “I’d always hoped it would be The New York Times that stole ideas from me,” says writer plagiarized by Boston Globe. (bostonherald.com)
* Oregonian receives a “Doonesbury” complaint – but not the usual one. (oregonlive.com)
* Deadspin’s attempt to crowdsource paycheck journalism goes flaccid. (observer.com)
* At the RNC, “the new media has decided that it wants to be the old media, and the old media has decided that it wants to be the new media.” (nytimes.com)
* The first radio commercial hit the airwaves 90 years ago. (NPR.org)
* Scott Kraft is named Los Angeles Times deputy managing editor. He’ll oversee the front page, Column One and projects. latimes.com)
* Cedar Rapids Gazette considers 100% employee ownership. (thegazette.com)

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