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Daily Archives: January 15, 2013

At McClatchy’s Miami Herald, “most full-time employees who work a regularly scheduled 40-hour week, including executives and managers, will be required to take one week of unpaid furlough by June 30, 2013,” publisher David Landsberg writes in a memo that was sent out this afternoon.

To all Herald staff:

Today we are announcing a furlough program for the first half of 2013. Most full-time employees who work a regularly scheduled 40-hour week, including executives and managers, will be required to take one week of unpaid furlough by June 30, 2013.
herald
Nationwide as well as in our business, recovery from the recession continues to be choppy, so we must strive to manage our expenses accordingly.

Furlough information and scheduling forms can be accessed by clicking on this link to HR Forms on HeraldHub. Each division will communicate specifics regarding this program and manage its own process for sign-up and scheduling.

Please know that we are seeing some positive results in our new revenue initiatives despite the uneven economic environment. Your contributions have been key to the accomplishments we’ve achieved in moving toward a successful future.

Thank you for your talent, hard work and dedication.

David

Tressler

Tressler

Sarah Tressler, who was fired by Hearst’s Houston Chronicle last March after it was reported that she was moonlighting as a stripper, is back in the newsroom. She’s now at Hearst’s San Antonio Express-News. (Her Twitter feed says she’s a “reporter covering cops, crime and general mayhem.”)

Express-News editor Michael Leary tells Romenesko readers: “The Go Team, to which Sarah is assigned, covers breaking news, primarily for our Website. I have no comment otherwise.” (I asked if she got the job as a part of a settlement with Hearst.)

Tressler writes in an email: “I haven’t any comment; sorry.”

She started the Express-News job last Friday.

From last March:
* Sarah Tressler: Writer by day, stripper by night (houstonpress.com)
* Houston Chronicle fires society writer/stripper (jimromenesko.com)

JUST IN FROM GAWKER MEDIA HEADQUARTERS:

From: Scott Kidder
To: [Gawker editorial]
Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2013 12:21 PM
Subject: December, 2012 — site uniques and top stories
gawker

Network Uniques and December, 2012 Top Stories

Not only did we finish the year strong, but all sites took great advantage of Pageviewapoolza and hit their 10% pageview target cap. Congrats!

For January we’re back to just the unique visitor targets. Godspeed!

s

TOP 10 GAWKER MEDIA STORIES IN DECEMBER
top

The Atlantic on its Church of Scientology-sponsored content:

We screwed up. It shouldn’t have taken a wave of constructive criticism — but it has — to alert us that we’ve made a mistake, possibly several mistakes.atlantic We now realize that as we explored new forms of digital advertising, we failed to update the policies that must govern the decisions we make along the way. It’s safe to say that we are thinking a lot more about these policies after running this ad than we did beforehand.

The advertorial has been pulled, but you can still read it here.

* Statement from The Atlantic: “We screwed up (magnetmail.net)

A Times memo says: “Starting immediately, Dick [Stevenson] becomes Chief Washington Correspondent, joining David Sanger in that role. Given their respective backgrounds, Dick will likely spend more time writing about domestic policy and politics, and David will spend more time writing about foreign policy and national security.”

Washington bureau chief David Leonhardt’s memo:

January 15, 2013

Dick Stevenson to Become Chief Washington Correspondent

Stevenson

Stevenson

If you’ve written a New York Times story with a Washington dateline in the last seven years, you have almost certainly benefited from the wisdom of Dick Stevenson. He knows policy and politics inside out and has a rare talent for turning subjects into stories. Even as an editor, when he was spending most of his time improving the stories that the rest of us wrote, he found time to write standout Washington analysis. His piece comparing the 2012 election to 2004, all the way back in Oct. 2011, remains one of the smartest, most prophetic stories of the recent campaign.

Now there will be many more such stories. Starting immediately, Dick becomes Chief Washington Correspondent, joining David Sanger in that role. Given their respective backgrounds, Dick will likely spend more time writing about domestic policy and politics, and David will spend more time writing about foreign policy and national security. But we have asked them to make sure they devote both of their brains to every important subject in Washington. David is particularly excited about the prospect of reuniting with a longtime journalistic teammate: David and Dick were young reporters in BizDay together; they were Washington economic correspondents together; and they covered the Bush White House together during two wars.

As Dick’s innovative work as politics editor has made clear, he has an unusually keen sense of the new world of digital journalism, and he plans on bringing that sense to his new role. In addition to enterprise stories and news analysis for the paper, he will be writing short pieces that will generally run on the Web in the morning. The pieces will carry their own label and sometimes – but not always – turn into stories for the paper. The goal with these pieces is to participate in the marketplace of ideas, as Dick puts it, at a time when The Times’s Web site has an enormous audience.

It’s hard to imagine a background better suited to this new role. Besides having been politics editor, deputy bureau chief, White House correspondent and economics correspondent, Dick has previously been a correspondent in Los Angeles and London. As colleagues and readers, we’re lucky that we’ll again be able to read a steady stream of Dick’s stories.

David

New York Times: Typically, MTV production assistant Yaffa Fredrick spends about $250 a week eating in good restaurants, which amounts to about $13,000 annually, and this does not include the additional $50 to $100 a week she spends on cooking classes, wine tastings and cheese pairings. About half of her salary is given over to food.

Yaffa Fredrick

Yaffa Fredrick

Yaffa Fredrick: “[The reporter] distorted some figures. I told her my most expensive week was $250, and she wrote it as if every week were $250 (when it’s more like $125 to dine out). …I was a little embarrassed about the piece so I actually didn’t share it with anyone. Instead, I let people find it. I wish she had framed my finances in a better light because, overall, I think of myself as fairly financially responsible.”

* Yaffa Fredrick sets the record straight on her restaurant spending (thebillfold.com)
* A new generation confronts the unaffordable luxury of food (nytimes.com)

* The Atlantic pulls its blog post sponsored by the Church of Scientology. (news.yahoo.com) sponsor| Read it here, then read the Boing Boing parody.
* Rupert Murdoch on buying the Los Angeles Times: “It won’t get through with the Democratic administration in place.” (latimes.com)
* New York Timesman Bob Tedeschi has a best-selling iPad app. (He left the gadgets beat because of it.) (nypost.com)
* WSJ.Money, a new insert, is for people “who are voyeuristically interested in the high end and are at the high end.” (adweek.com)
* Aaron Swartz’s 8th grade science teacher tells Patch: “He wasn’t really a kid when others were a kid.” (Patch.com)
* Listen to Swartz — at age 14 — on Chicago Public Radio’s morning talk show. (chicagoist.com)
* David Letterman may be gearing up for a Super Bowl three-peat. (adage.com)
* Dunder Mifflin to air Super Bowl ad in Scranton, Pa. (adweek.com)
tipping* “Tipping point,” “reinventing” and other words journalists love too much. (nytimes.com)
* PBS to broadcast a week of “After Newtown” programming. (washingtonpost.com)
* Middletown (CT) Press reporter is assaulted while covering a bomb threat. (connecticutnewsroom.com)
* It’s Kate Aurthur vs. Howard Kurtz — again. (Now with an email exchange.) (buzzfeed.com)
* Highlights from David Carr’s Reddit AMA (ask me anything). (mediabistro.com)
* Five more journalists join the Orange County Register. (mediabistro.com)