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Daily Archives: January 28, 2013

lust

A Romenesko reader writes: “On Sunday, The Salt Lake Tribune’s comics section ran a ‘Baby Blues’ with ‘The Natural Order of Things: Love, Lust and Laundry.’ The Deseret News instead ran one where Zoe wrote to the Tooth Fairy about forgetting to pick up her tooth and leave some money. I guess LUST was too much for the family-friendly Deseret News.” I’ve asked News features editor Aaron Shill about the substitution.

* Salt Lake Tribune’s 1/27 “Baby Blues” | Deseret News’ 1/27 “Baby Blues”

From New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson’s memo:
* Jason Stallman will be the Times’ new sports editor.
* Larry Ingrassia will be the assistant managing editor for new initiatives.
* Glenn Kramon will steer technology coverage
* Ian Fisher will be assistant managing editor for content operations.
* Janet Elder will be assistant managing editor for newsroom administration.
* “We will be naming a new culture editor in the next two weeks.”

Subject: Note From Jill: A New Chapter

Colleagues,

I wanted to let you know quickly that we are through the process of offering voluntary buyouts and cutting staff. In the end, we had to lay off far fewer people than we anticipated, having achieved most of our savings through the voluntary process.
Unknown-4
We will continue to reposition ourselves, to meet the challenges of remaking ourselves for the digital age. The changes underway are part of the journeythat we’ve been on for years: integrating our print and digital operations, expanding our reporting, deepening our ways of telling stories, innovating in ways that make our journalism the literal envy of our profession and the joy of our readers.

This means that some colleagues are changing roles. Rick Berke will now focus on video as it becomes an even bigger part of our news report. Glenn Kramon will steer our technology coverage when it is at the heart of how the world turns. These are urgent assignments requiring leaders who know the full panoply of what the newsroom is capable of doing.

We will be naming a new culture editor in the next two weeks. Jason Stallman will be our new sports editor./CONTINUES Read More

Letter to Romenesko

From JASON CHUPICK, Harper’s public relations veep: I’d say too much virtual ink has been spilled on this “controversy” (“Harper’s tricked by comedy fake news story about ‘visual allergies’ lawsuit”). I can also say I’ve never responded to the media with emoticons before. It’s more of a hattip to pop culture than a riddle. I hope someone picks up on it and solves it.
girls

I wrote Jason back and told him I was stumped. He replied:

It’s from the recent season premier of Girls, where Ray complains to Shoshana about her use of emoji in his texts. “A panda next to a gun next to a wrapped gift? It makes no sense.” This media flap and resulting trade interview became so absurd it’s how we felt. Or I should say, the managing editor who handles Findings each month (he’s frighteningly smart and almost never makes mistakes).

* Imediaethics: Harper’s “responded with an Easter Egg in JPEG form” (imediaethics.org)
* Magazine duped by CBC Radio ‘visual allergy’ parody (storify.com/cbccommunity)
* Pandas, guns and wrapped gifts – “Girls” Season 2 Episode 1 (thats-normal.com)

correct

* David Carr: “Pretty sure I won the dubious honor of best correction on the Internet today (@carr2n)
* Carr’s story: Fortifying the empire “South Park” built (nytimes.com)

“Did you hear Eleanor Beardsley on NPR yesterday?” writes a Romenesko reader who doesn’t want to be named. “She spent over 5 minutes on the air ranting about dog poop on sidewalks in Paris and admitted she spray paints sidewalks there to call attention to it.”Unknown-1

Here’s what she said:

I made a cardboard, cutout stencil that said, “Be Proud of Paris!” and sprayed it next to the piles, thinking I could shame people into picking up. When that didn’t seem to work, I just circled the patties in bright red paint and wrote “Shame!” next to them.

“It was funny, but odd,” my emailer writes. “I wonder how many other reporters could brag of spreading graffiti.”

I’m waiting to hear back from Beardsley and NPR spokeswoman Anna Christopher.

* In Paris, a hunt for those who dodge dog duties (npr.org)

“We’re not commenting or giving interviews about this,” Melinda Gutierrez of the Dallas Police Department told me this afternoon. The now-deleted tweet read: “@DallasPD: I just sliced 38 fruit in Classic Mode on Fruit Ninja for iPhone!” Gutierrez did confirm that the thousands of retweets on the apology is a department record.

Letter to Romenesko

From BEN YAGODA: The new-look New Republic may be cool and rich and everything, but the extent to which its piece (posted yesterday) about the resurgence of the word “lady”ladies borrowed (that is the polite word) from the piece Maria Yagoda and I wrote on the same subject for the Chronicle of Higher Education, posted 11/29, was way out of line.

In addition to the topic itself (not insignificant), TNR’s piece had virtually the same title, made most of the same points, and, most shockingly of all, started off with the same embedded clip from HBO’s “Girls” that we started off with.

See for yourself:

Our piece, “Hey, ‘Lady’!”.

Their piece, “Hey ‘Ladies’” (omitting the comma actually makes the title worse).

Ben Yagoda

I’ve asked “Hey Ladies” author Ann Friedman and The New Republic to respond.

UPDATE: New Republic editor FRANKLIN FOER writes: “When we titled Ann Friedman’s piece ‘Hey, Ladies,’ we were name checking a song by the Beastie Boys. We hadn’t seen Ben Yagoda’s piece in the Chronicle of Higher Education. If we both arrived at the same subject independently, well, that’s why they call it a trend.”

Minnesota political analyst Eric Ostermeier reviewed more than 150 of Sarah Palin’s Fox News appearances and figured out that she was paid $15.85 per word during her three years on the network.

Religion was frequently peppered into Palin’s commentary and the former governor uttered “Amen” 111 times across her 151 appearances.sarah

She also mentioned “God” 57 times, Christians and Christianity 16 times, Moses three times, and Jesus once.

This isn’t to say Palin didn’t occasionally dance with the devil – delivering the PG-13 “heck” 28 times, “darn” nine times, “hell” seven times, and “damn” twice.

* The price of Palin: $15.85 per word on Fox News (blog.lib.umn.edu)

Unknown-1Starting in August, the Cavalier Daily will be published only on Mondays and Thursdays as a newsmagazine with “extensive analysis, informative graphics and an increased focus on features, local entertainment and weekend previews,” says departing editor-in-chief Matthew Cameron. He says the University of Virginia paper will expand its online and mobile content offerings.

* Cavalier Daily announces restructuring (cavalierdaily.com)

UnknownBoston Magazine’s Alan Siegel takes a bat to his city’s sports journalists, calling them stale, crotchety and shameless blowhards. “And we haven’t even gotten to Dan Shaughnessy yet.”

It’s not just the city’s core sports personalities that haven’t changed much. The way the local media covers games is stuck in the past, too. Beat writers may blog, chat, and utilize social media now, but after games, they’re still churning out the same kinds of vanilla recaps that have long been a newspaper staple.

Any Boston journalists care to fire back — or confirm what Siegel writes?

* The fellowship of the miserable (bostonmagazine.com)
* The joys of covering the Boston Red Sox (bostonmagazine.com)

Frank Sennett tells Romenesko readers that “even before the latest stumbles by the Atlantic and BuzzFeed with sponsored content online, I saw a need for an end to the Wild West moment we’re going through.” He hoped to work on some industry guidelines as a Nieman fellow, but didn’t get the position.

Frank Sennett

Frank Sennett

“I have continued to work on them” while editing Time Out Chicago, he writes. “I haven’t done an ethics project since Slipup.com back in the 90s, but this one piqued my interest.”

Here’s what Sennett has put together:

Proposed ethics guidelines for online sponsored content

By Frank Sennett*

Ad-supported journalism is being consumed in record quantities, but those of us who manage media companies face a stark reality: Traditional advertising dollars in print and broadcast become dimes on the full-scale web, and they tend to disappear entirely on mobile devices. Alternative revenue models, then, are key to success, but only if they follow ethics guidelines that protect media outlets from losing credibility with readers.

Sponsored content, as it is now being published on the full-scale and mobile web, differs from old-fashioned print advertorial in significant ways. The biggest departure is that, rather than passively receiving and publishing advertorial copy from ad agencies, media outlets are more often partnering with brands to create custom-content “native advertising” campaigns that resonate with readers who fit the publication’s demographic profile.

- From niemanlab.org

– From niemanlab.org

BuzzFeed, for instance, employs a large staff to craft brand-marketing pieces that readers will share with friends via Facebook and other social networks. One such recent post, “11 Things No One Wants To See You Instagram,” quickly drew 330,000 views on behalf of advertiser Virgin Mobile, the Wall Street Journal reported. Similarly, Forbes Media created a Forbes BrandVoice program through which brands can submit paid articles to the Forbes website. “The advertiser-sponsored copy appears in the same style and format as articles contributed by Forbes writers and editors,” New York Post media columnist Keith J. Kelly reported in November. (The BrandVoice connection is noted at the top of posts.)/CONTINUES Read More