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Daily Archives: March 21, 2013

shoestrip

“Shoe” was written and drawn by the late Chicago Tribune cartoonist Jeff MacNelly from 1977 until his death in 2000. I’ve asked Tribune associate managing editor/entertainment Geoff Brown to tell us more about the decision to drop its legendary ex-cartoonist’s creation.

UPDATE: “Chicago Tribune continuously aims to enhance the reader experience by making improvements to content offerings,” Brown writes in an email. “In an effort to provide fresh humor and interactivity, we’re adding a crossword puzzle, trivia game and new cartoon.”

I asked him how “Shoe” did in reader surveys. “Our customer reader research is proprietary, so I can’t share the data with you.”

* Chicago Tribune announces changes in comics and puzzles (chicagotribune.com)
* June 9, 2000: Chicago Tribune’s Jeff MacNelly — creator of “Shoe” — dies at 52

UPDATE 2: “I knew Jeff,” former Greensboro News & Record editor John Robinson writes on my Facebook wall. “Given what has and is happening at the Tribune, he’d likely be happy to be rid of it.”

Romenesko reader Mike Poller spotted this on HARO (Help a Reporter Out):

Summary: Sex with aliens

Name: David Moye The Huffington Post

images-1Category: General

Email: query-2×59@helpareporter.net

Media Outlet: The Huffington Post

Deadline: 7:00 PM EST – 22 March

Query:

HuffPost journalist is doing a story about the concept of sex with aliens. Would like to speak with people who’ve had sex with aliens, UFO experts, biological experts who can discuss the potential problems of mating with a foreign species, psychological experts who have studied the phenomenon.

Requirements:

Looking for people familiar with the phenomenon of sex with aliens, considering all points of view skeptics and believers.

How many people responded?

Fifteen so far, says David Moye, a writer for Huffington Post’s Weird News section. “Two or three of them were for people pimping novels.”

He adds: “I have developed a reputation as the guy who does the best (or worst) HARO queries ever. The Awl and the Village Voice even did a story about me two years ago because they thought I was joking.”


1963: President Kennedy welcomes the Miami Herald staff to their new home.
2013: Miami Herald building to be demolished to make way for new condo units.

* Miami Herald alums gather for last hurrah at 1 Herald Plaza

President Kennedy’s letter to Herald publisher Jack Knight

 - Image via @matthaggman

– Image via @matthaggman

A Courage Campaign petition calls David and Charles Koch “the worst of the worst … known for buying elections, funding anti-science organizations, union busting, dodging taxes, and twisting democracy any way they can to promote their personal agenda.”

kochsThey cannot be allowed to purchase one of the most respected newspapers in the country in the second biggest media market in order to peddle their discredited ideas and right wing propaganda.

Millions of Angelenos count on the Los Angeles Times for real facts, real issues, and unbiased information. The L.A. Times endorsements in local and statewide elections carry substantial clout. The Koch brothers cannot be allowed to control this vital source of information.

At last check, the Koch foes were at 74% of their goal of 15,000 signatures.

* Tell the Tribune Co.: “No sale to the Kochs” (couragecampaign.org)

Tim Tebow met his fans at Whataburger Field in Corpus Christi on Wednesday. Journalists were given these rules for covering the event:

tebow

* Tim Tebow tells Whataburger Field crowd to live a life of passion (caller.com)

UPDATE: I asked Corpus Christi Caller-Times reporter Sarah Acosta what it was like covering the event. She sends this email:

For the media it wasn’t a picnic. I lucked out and got to take up close pictures and video of Tebow, because our paper had a sponsor table on the field next to the stage, so I was no longer “media.”

So basically the general public had more access to Tebow than the media. We were only allowed to snap pictures of him or video (with no sound) of him walking in and out of the building. We weren’t allowed to ask him questions.

But of course, the four media groups in town- it’s not like we’re NY- it’s Corpus Christi, TX- we rolled our cameras with sound- and tried to ask him questions, for the 20 seconds we saw him. Like- why did you come to Corpus? What’s your message? Asked if he was available for questions afterwards- but he politely declined and all we got was a wave out of it.

My photographer and other videographers from other stations on the other hand had it really bad. They were trying to get footage while in the media section and kept getting scolded or would be asked to put away their camera. We weren’t allowed to photograph him while he was speaking- just the crowd.

Like I said, I got up close pictures of him on stage, because I posed as non-media, but as a regular person seated on the big dollar tables. Like several of VIP ticket holders did, they ran up to him and asked him to sign autographs or take pictures. I was snapping pictures of all of this and took video- and it’s funny because the ticket holders and kids that went to see him were asking him questions like- Are you going to play for the Jets next year? If you’re such a big Dallas Cowboys fan, why don’t you play for them? They got to play the role of the journalists.

Our photographer was able to get pictures of him on stage, because he eventually left the media section, and went up to our suite at the baseball stadium that our paper owns. I believe the other media got frustrated and left.

If our organization, the Caller-Times, hadn’t had the connections like a private suite at the stadium where you couldn’t be bothered or a sponsorship table on the floor of the event, then we wouldn’t had been able to take the pictures or videos we needed.

As a way around it, I live tweeted the event, since we weren’t allowed to record audio.

I do believe though, it was all about Tebow’s management, not him or the organizations that put the event on. The organizations were not pleased with the strict rules his management gave them about the media, because they wanted positive publicity for their event.




Buffalo News owner Warren Buffett visits the newspaper

Buffett signs News staffers' money. (Buffalo News photo)

Buffett signs News staffers’ money. (Buffalo News photo)

“Buffett fielded questions from employees and a reporter on topics including the high unemployment rate, raising the minimum wage, investing in the stock market, advising new college graduates and buying the Buffalo Bills,” reports Stephen Watson. The billionaire investor said of the Bills: “If I were rich and somewhat younger, and lived in Buffalo, I’d buy them in a second. But I’m not taking on new things that my heirs will want to wrestle with.”
* In Buffalo, an ever-bullish Buffett targets timely issues (buffalonews.com)

Also:
* Why one journalist loves news: “It’s not about the money to me. It’s about discovery.” (tulsaworld.com)
* Who’s right about journalism today? Pew or Matthew Yglesias? (ajr.org)
* “Yglesias is at once absolutely right and absolutely wrong,” writes Alan Mutter. (newsosaur.blogspot.com)
* PR people make more money than journalists. Is that fair? (prdaily.com)
* Oh no, Albany Times Union! Tuesday: We have brand new presses! Thursday: They broke down so many didn’t get their paper. (timesunion.com)
* Denver Post’s gun-bill signing photo on Facebook is tagged “Retarded A$$hole” and “Dumb C*nt.” (westword.com)
* Calvin Trillin: “When I worked at Time, all editors and writers were male and all researchers were female, as a matter of policy.” (newyorker.com)
* “What we call older people is going to be a hot button going forward,” says Ann Brenoff. “And journalists are setting the scene right now.” (huffingtonpost.com)
fletcher* Remember all the hoopla about Dan Fletcher (left) being named Facebook managing editor? Well, he’s resigned after 15 months and says the social media giant “doesn’t need reporters.” (pbs.org/mediashift)
* Nine Twin Cities writers launch an opinion website. (citypages.com)
* Why Matthew Keys is no Aaron Swartz. (“Aside from the difference in their alleged crimes, there’s also a split in apparent motives.”) (washingtonpost.com)
* A judge sides with Associated Press in the Meltwater copyright dispute. (news.yahoo.com)
* Auburn (NY) Citizen kills its Monday print edition. (auburnpub.com)