Boston Globe managing editor Caleb Solomon joins Bloomberg News

Caleb Solomon

Caleb Solomon

Boston Globe managing editor/digital Caleb Solomon has been named a Bloomberg News editor-at-large. He joined the Globe in 2003 as business editor.

“With this, the Globe loses a newsroom leader with uncommon vision and an unrivaled talent for getting things done,” writes Globe editor Brian McGrory. “I also lose a trusted colleague, a compatriot for many years, a collaborative boss with many virtues, and over the past few months, a graceful source of constant wisdom as I’ve settled into this most recent role.”

The Globe memo:

From: McGrory, Brian
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2013 2:02 PM
To: !BGHQ-Editorial
Subject: Caleb Solomon

It doesn’t seem all that long ago, though it was about 8 or 9 years, that I watched from my columnist’s perch in the middle of the newsroom as the business department, under the leadership of new editor Caleb Solomon, basically seemed to dominate the world. Reporters broke story after story on the mutual fund market-timing scandal. They showed that Boston Scientific’s highly lauded stents weren’t all they were cracked up to be. The department was winning national awards, splashing enterprise all over the front page, and devoting itself to a digital first strategy long before the rest of the paper, or really any paper, understood the future and power of the Internet.

It was obvious then that Caleb would have a profound impact on the Globe for as long as he would remain here, and that’s been proven year after year, job after job, from his ascension to deputy managing editor of enterprise, to managing editor, and most recently, to managing editor for digital, further leading us to a future in which technology goes hand-in-hand with journalism./CONTINUES

I bring all this up because I have some difficult news to share. Caleb has decided to leave the Globe after a decade-long run. He’s accepted a job with Bloomberg News as an editor at-large in the Boston bureau.
With this, the Globe loses a newsroom leader with uncommon vision and an unrivaled talent for getting things done. I also lose a trusted colleague, a compatriot for many years, a collaborative boss with many virtues, and over the past few months, a graceful source of constant wisdom as I’ve settled into this most recent role.

Among Caleb’s many strengths, there’s one I’ve always admired the most: He thinks big, relentlessly so. He sees opportunities, not difficulties. He readily engages others and sets them free in pursuit of success. This creativity takes many forms – the reinvention of the Globe 100 as a glossy, hugely successful magazine, the creation of the Globe Top Places to Work, the discovery of major talents like Chris Rowland and Jenn Abelson, both brought into the Business section by Caleb from the zones.

As a DME, Caleb oversaw an entirely new mindset in how we look at the front page, which is to say more creatively, with a redesign that brought us the wildly popular “In the news” column, while encouraging stories that are enterprising and visuals that are ever more striking. This continued after he became managing editor in 2008, when Caleb led a redesign of the rest of the paper that included the invention of the g section. When I was metro editor, he and I worked closely on virtually every major news event, from the illness and death of Ted Kennedy, to critical elections, to significant scandals. Our mutual mantra was always this: Be bold and take risks.

All along, Caleb was spreading his wings on the digital side, helping to integrate technology and the staffers who are so good at it into the newsroom at large. He helped develop the two-brands strategy that led to the award-winning bostonglobe.com. He has been a singular force in our video operation, seeing the early potential, sticking with it as other news organizations cut back, and demanding that it be a core part of our story-telling and news-gathering technique. In just a couple of months as ME for digital, Caleb has successfully begun untangling our two websites and further refining the unique personality of the wildly popular boston.com.

This is why it’s difficult to say goodbye. Caleb, who arrived here after a successful stint at the Wall Street Journal in Brussels, Texas, Boston, and New York, will leave at the end of next week. We’ll cut a cake before then. Maybe he’ll explain how Bloomberg makes all that money from those terminals.

In terms of us, my every aim and expectation is to fill that position, a truly critical one as we gain so much momentum in this necessary, exciting evolution from print to digital – a shift, by the way, in which the Globe has been a leader since the 1990s. We’re amid a period of uncertainty on a few fronts here; I don’t have to tell you that. But you continue to produce extraordinary work from all corners of this operation. Keep it up, control that which we can control, and I’ll keep you informed, as best as I can, on developments along the way.

Brian

* Jonathan Martin quits Politico and joins the New York Times (huffingtonpost.com)

Comments

comments