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Daily Archives: August 19, 2013

- Glenn Greenwald and David Mirando (photo: Ricardo Moraes)

– Glenn Greenwald and David Miranda (photo: Ricardo Moraes)

“It may not be long before it will be impossible for journalists to have confidential sources.” — The Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger. (theguardian.com) | Rusbridger’s comments
* Rupert Murdoch’s investment in Vice Media “may end up being the most conservative media deal of the year.” (adage.com)
* Amazon.com lost $4.8 million when it went down for 40 minutes this afternoon. (geekwire.com)
* Grist’s David Roberts is going to vanish for a year. “I am burnt the fuck out,” he says. (grist.org)
* Conde Nast stops paying interns. (gawker.com)
callie* Callie Schweitzer (left): “I’ve always said I am a journalist, even when I had the word ‘marketing’ in my title.” (northwestern.edu)
* Ousted Conde Nast Traveler editor Klara Glowczewska “wasn’t willing to be ruthless.” (wwd.com)
* Gary Knell insists his decision to leave NPR for National Geographic “wasn’t really driven by a financial equation.” (nytimes.com)
* Detention of Glenn Greenwald’s partner “sure does take the Great out of Great Britain. (usatoday.com)
* Howard Kurtz’s Daily Download colleague Lauren Ashburn joins Fox News. (huffingtonpost.com)
* Joanne Lipman was yesterday’s “Reliable Sources” guest host. (cnn.com)
* Indianapolis Colts quarterback will be sending flowers to the Fox sideline reporter who took “a bad pass to the face.” (chicagotribune.com)
* The best of John Oliver’s “Daily Show” guest-host segments. (splitsider.com)

Romenesko reader Matthew Budman send this note on Sunday: “Check out The Daily Beast’s summer-of-1973 Watergate retrospective, labeled prominently as ’30 Years Later’ rather than, well, forty years later. The error is in the headline, URL, and text. Hilarious.”
WATER1

Budman emailed this update at 1:35 p.m. CT today: “Believe it or not, The Daily Beast just now fixed the page, thirty hours after posting it.”
WATER2

* Watergate 30 (or 40) years later: Newsweek covers from the summer of ’73 (thedailybeast.com)

The executive editor of Gannett’s Staunton (VA) News Leader has apologized for the F-word used in a “Kid’s Corner” caption that’s supplied by Accuweather.com.

“The language was not caught by our editors and made it into print,” writes David Fritz. “First of all, we apologize for this getting into the newspaper. Secondly, we’ll be working internally and with our vendor to make certain that there’s no repeat.”

The cutline came from The Onion. (h/t Adam B. Sullivan)
kidscorner

* Our apologies for objectionable caption (newsleader.com)


Gary Knell, who is leaving NPR to become National Geographic CEO, tells his employees: “It has taken a great deal of personal reflection on my part to reach this decision.gary I will leave with a sense of enormous gratitude to each of you for all you do to make this organization a national treasure.” He has been NPR chief executive for 21 months.

“I was approached by [National Geographic] recently and offered an opportunity that, after discussions with my family, I could not turn down,” he writes.

When he joined NPR from Sesame Workshop, Knell said he was taking a pay cut. (His total compensation for his last year at Sesame was $740,000.) John Fahey Jr., the man Knell’s replacing at National Geographic, was paid over $1.4 million, according to the most recent IRS Form 990 filing. (In her last year as NPR CEO, Vivian Schiller was paid $479,000, according to a 2009-2010 filing. There aren’t any public filings that I could find that show Knell’s NPR salary. Anyone know it? Email me please.)

Who replaces Knell at NPR? A Facebook follower writes: “Calling Torey Malatia…” (He was recently ousted as head of Chicago’s WBEZ.)

* NPR CEO Gary Knell announces he’s leaving (npr.org) | (press release)
* Knell says he didn’t quit over differences with NPR’s board (wbur.org)

hireme“This guy is currently standing outside of the BuzzFeed office,” tweets BuzzFeed foreign editor Miriam Elder. “Hired already, I hope,” says Jeff Jarvis.

UPDATE: “His name is Tri Vo,” says BuzzFeed spokesperson Ashley McCollum. “Melissa Rosenthal, our Director of Creative Services, and a bunch of people from her team went down to meet him. We love his creativity!”

* See the full view of this BuzzFeed intern candidate (@MiriamElder)

newpost

Barron’s columnist Andrew Bary says Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway is “a logical buyer” of the Washington Post Co. that doesn’t include the newspaper. He points out that Buffett was a longtime Post director before retiring in 2011, and he’s close to WPO chief executive Don Graham.

Meanwhile, Washington Post Outlook editor Carlos Lozada has already received a pitch for a piece that “Mr. Bezos will like.”

* A buy — Washington Post Co. without the Post (online.wsj.com)

Eric Spitz, president of Orange County Register parent Freedom Communications, writes in today’s Register and Wall Street Journal:

How can a newspaper charge for its content when other competitors choose to give away their work? The old-fashioned way — by differentiating the content, boosting its quality and making it essential to the community it serves. HBO, satellite radio and FedEx famously figured out this value problem. Why not newspapers?

I know of only two major newspaper companies that have not seen significant declines in their subscriber bases in the past decade: The Wall Street Journal and Groupa Reforma, the largest newspaper company in Mexico. The former has never given away its digital content, and the latter erected its first paywall in 2002.

* Newspapers can stop chasing the “digital ghost” (ocregister.com)

Former Wall Street Journal assistant publisher’s tweet:

* Earlier: Tofel on how newspapers blew it in the mid-1990s (jimromenesko.com)


* Time’s Michael Grunwald apologizes for his “dumb” Assange/drone tweet. “I deserve the backlash,” he writes. (newyorker.com)
* London police will be asked to justify the detention of Glenn Greenwald’s partner. (bbc.co.uk) | (nytimes.com) | Greenwald’s column about this: (theguardian.com)
long* Aaron Kushner’s Long Beach Register launches. (ocregister.com) | (AP via washingtonpost.com)
* The sale of Chronicle of the Horse magazine has readers upset. One says of the deal: “This is starting to feel a little Rupert Murdoch-ish…ewwwwww.” (washingtonpost.com)
* On Al Jazeera America, “there will be less opinion, less yelling and fewer celebrity sightings.” (nytimes.com) | Some advertisers are afraid of being associated with an Arabic name. (adweek.com)
* Who needs an iPad when you’re carrying a large-screen smartphone? (adage.com)
* Ken Doctor: If Patch is a failure, let’s also note it’s a partly noble one. (niemanlab.org)
* John Sununu: “Politicians shouldn’t choose which journalists warrant special protections, and which do not.” (bostonglobe.com) | Good luck making sense of Sununu’s column. (dankennedy.net)
* TechCrunch examines the leaked Patch ad sales figures. (techcrunch.com)
* Alison Stewart’s book could be turned into a TV series called “Friday Night Blacks,” says her husband. (mediabistro.com)
* Podcasting’s back — and booming, according to USA Today. (usatoday.com) | What I listened to over the weekend: NYT’s Amy Harmon on the Longform podcast. (longform.org)
ranking* Julian Assange praises “news media innovator” Matt Drudge. (themoderatevoice.com)
* Thanks for reading JimRomenesko.com! Alexa.com stats: JimRomenesko.com | Poynter.org
* College paper’s April Fool’s story about Meryl Streep was tweeted out as real last week. (collegemediamatters.com)
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