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Daily Archives: November 18, 2013

Greene County Record editor Pat Fitzgerald sends the item below and asks: “Was this headline/story outsourced?” (A “robot journalist” wrote it, maybe?)
headline

* Santa Rosa police investigation possible gang-related stabbing new middle school (insidebayarea.com)

Some of the Bloomberg News journalists laid off today, according to Talking Biz News:

Rich Jaroslovsky, technology columnist and tech products reviewer. “It’s been quite a ride,” he tweets.
bloombergElliot Blair Smith, an investigative and projects reporter
Charles R. Babcock, an investigative and projects editor
Chris Burritt, a Greensboro, N.C.-based reporter
Laurie Muchnick, book editor. She tweets: “Not sure how to put this so here goes: Bloomberg is cutting arts coverage, including books, so today was my last day there.”
Tim Homan, congressional reporter
Bill Koenig, Detroit bureau editor

Do you have more names? Were you laid off? Please let me know.

Updates:

A reader reports these D.C. bureau dismissals: Ann Hughey, a weekend editor; Leslie Hoffecker, an editor; Steve Walsh, a Congress Tracker reporter; and Curtis Eichelberger, a sports enterprise reporter.

“Catherine Smith, who had been with BN for more than 15 years was [let go]. As were Daniel Billy, Jeremy Gerard and Jeffery Burke.”

“Terrified of another EEOC lawsuit, the company worked closely with in-house counsel to obfuscate from the public that the vast majority of those laid off were older reporters and editors. Each terminated employee was shown a list of OTHER terminated employees, along with their ages, to show that the median age of terminations was low. Then, employees were required to sign a NDA in order to retain any benefits. This from a company who allegedly built its reputation on transparency.”

* Bloomberg lays off staff in sports and culture (nytimes.com) | Layoffs show shift in priorities (observer.com)

* Bloomberg departees include Loeb winner, Pulitzer finalist, ex-executive editor (talkingbiznews.com)
* Bloomberg News to lay off about 50 people (wsj.com)

Fox Business reported earlier today that Jeff Bezos’s first move as owner of the Washington Post was changing the paper’s name to Graham Holdings. This, said Fox Biz’s reporter, “will change the face of the newspaper, literally.” The story was later tweaked.

* Washington Post’s name changed to Graham Holdings (foxbusiness.com)
* Meet Graham Holdings Co. (washingtonpost.com)
postgraham

— h/t Bob Joseph

TINAREAD

Big news last week was that Tina Brown now prefers conversation over reading. The world is “going back to oral culture where the written word will be less relevant,” she told the Hindustan Times. “I think you can have more satisfaction from live conversations.”

The former Vanity Fair, New Yorker and Newsweek editor has clarified her remarks: “I am as voracious a reader as ever,” Brown says, but she has no interest in editing another print magazine. It’s “no fun swimming against the tide,” she notes.

* Tina Brown says she’s as voracious a reader of print as ever (capitalnewyork.com)
* Earlier: Tina Brown doesn’t read magazines anymore (hindustantimes.com)

Port Washington (Wis.) city hall and police department janitor Jim Radloff says he “couldn’t believe what I was reading” when he spotted the paid notice about his death.

“It was a short notice, but I was so shocked it seemed as if my name was huge,” says the 64-year-old man. “I must have told 10 or 11 people the whole story, until the minutes on my cell phone ran out.”

The whole (or most of) the story: Radloff has a “strained relationship” with his daughter because of her boyfriend. The boyfriend tried to place the notice in the weekly Ozaukee Press, but a reporter called the funeral home and was told there were no arrangements for the supposedly deceased janitor. The Press refused to run the notice, so the boyfriend then had it placed in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

“I couldn’t believe he would pull something like that,” says Radloff. “It is about the lowest thing a person can do.”

* Wisconsin man stunned to read his own obit in the paper (fox6now.com)
* Contrary to obituary, Port Washington man is alive and well (ozaukeepress.com)


Detroit emergency manager spokesman Bill Nowling has told journalists not to leave voice mail messages because “believe it or not,DETROIT VM just adds delay in responding.” He notes that “it is not unusual for me to have 25 or more VMs waiting to be heard at any given time. …Thank you for your understanding and please don’t hesitate to ’email me’ if you have questions.”

The Detroit reporter who sent me the memo below writes in an email: “Just thought it seemed a little strange to have a press secretary tell all reporters, ‘don’t call me anymore.’ Maybe I’m just old fashioned.” || Update: Nowling defends his no-VM policy at DeadlineDetroit.com.
—–

From: Bill Nowling
Date: November 15, 2013 at 3:34:36 PM EST
Subject: New Media Contacting Procedure for EM Orr’s Office

Colleagues,

To better assist you and your organization with media questions and interview requests, I am instituting a new “contact procedure” that I think will streamline the process and get you the information you need in a timely fashion. Please review the procedure below and share it with your reporters and colleagues. (Many of you already do this and I thank you.)/CONTINUES Read More

* Bloomberg suspends reporter Michael Forsythe for allegedly leaking to the New York Times. (nytimes.com) | (nypost.com)
* Jay Rosen will be a paid adviser to Pierre Omidyar and his team of NewCo journalists. (pressthink.org)
* The nonprofit that runs the struggling Newseum paid its retired CEO nearly $1 million in 2012, according to a new filing. (gannettblog.blogspot.com)
strib
* Minneapolis officials: Go ahead and demolish the Star Tribune building; just make sure the medallions on the front are saved. (startribune.com)
* Emerson College School of Communication will be renamed the “Ron Burgundy School of Communication” for one day. (emerson.edu)
* Photographer shoots 200 portraits of unrelated people who look alike. “A few are amazing,” says David Pogue. (@pogue)
* Washington Post Co. – now without the Washington Post – changes its name to Graham Holdings Co. (washpostco.com)
* Philadelphia Inquirer’s value has gone from $515 million to $55 million in six years, reports Ralph Cipriano. (bigtrial.net)
* “2013 is turning out to be the year that print didn’t die.” (deadtreeedition.blogspot.com)
* “Raul Ramirez was deeply committed to preserving the high standards of journalistic integrity, public service and investigative reporting, and diversity in journalism.” (kqed.org)
* Financial Times launches a “gift articles” feature. (niemanlab.org)
* High on “influential” High Times magazine. (newrepublic.com)
* “Podcasts today are what underground zines were in the ’90s …everyone seems to have one.” (wsj.com)
* The six most-revised Wikipedia pages. (nymag.com)

tornado
Indianapolis Star education reporter Eric Weddle reports this tornado/UFO photo was posted on the WTHR (“Indiana’s News Leader”) website and other news outlets. One of his Instagram commenters spotted Big Foot in the altered image, too. (Here’s the original photo, taken by one of the reporter’s friends.) Update: Weddle points out that the photo was posted by a WTHR “iwitness” contributor.

Also: Chicago’s CBS affiliate aired a viewer-submitted photo that included a sign warning drivers of man-cow sex.