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Daily Archives: December 13, 2013

New York magazine editor Adam Moss told CUNY j-school grads this week (seventh item)times “Eleven days ago, my employer announced that after 45 years of publishing a weekly magazine, New York was going to convert to a biweekly. This news found itself on the front page of the New York Times.

“Does the front page of the New York Times even matter anymore? I was shocked by how many people in this business didn’t even see it.”

After reading that, former Times executive editor Max Frankel sent me this email: “Tell Adam Moss the Times front page matters mightily, just not when it features a columnist who buried his only nugget of news. Maybe the columnist [David Carr] was pulling his punches out of affection for the magazine, in which case he deserved better than a dismissive comment. For easy proof of front-page consequence, see ‘china government attitude new york times.'”

Update — Adam Moss sends this response:

Regarding Max Frankel’s note in response to my aside in a speech to CUNY Journalism School graduates: I didn’t mean to suggest that the NY Times itself doesn’t matter. I agree with Max that the paper “matters mightily.”

Adam Moss

Adam Moss

Among other things, the speech addressed changes in journalistic forms and distribution. I was merely saying by way of a throwaway illustration (perhaps an overly glib one) that the placement of a story on the front page of the physical paper doesn’t confer the same sense of urgency or hierarchical importance it once did. The Times alternates lede stories many times a day, and if you read the paper’s contents digitally, as most readers do, you have no idea a story once was, or might later be, on the front page of the paper. I wouldn’t have thought this point was controversial, and I certainly didn’t mean it be dismissive. The Times’s journalism is hugely influential, and it’s a very good thing it is.

* Adam Moss addresses CUNY j-grads (seventh item) (capitalnewyork.com)
* New York magazine cuts back (nytimes.com)

A Romenesko reader writes: “Anonymous tip: I was in Time Inc. yesterday and a friend at [one of the company’s publications] told me that all of the magazine productiontime folk at the Time Inc. titles have been told that the company is eliminating mastheads in its magazines. Have you heard of this? I can’t imagine. Vanity is the motivating force behind most people working in publishing; it’s like eliminating bylines. Might be worth checking into.”

I checked into it this afternoon and was told by a Time Inc. spokeswoman that getting rid of mastheads is being considered, but “a decision has not been made.”

* Mark Remy suggests a magazine with nothing but mastheads (facebook.com)

birds
* From here on out, Santa should be a penguin (with correction) (slate.com)

Good try, Slate, but the week’s best correction goes to the Huffington Post, which ran this:
hawaii
* Emma Stone and Bill Murray surprise troops (with correction) (huffingtonpost.com)

newtoner

Hilary Sargent, who’s known for tackling “complicated matters in easily digestible charts,” is joining Boston.com next month as a full-time staffer. Jack Shafer wrote earlier this year that “ChartGirl” Sargent “straddles the space between the two-dimensional, black-and-white editorial cartoon, the explanatory feature and the cheat sheet, bringing order to the narrative frenzy.”

Here’s the memo that was sent Thursday afternoon to Boston.com and Globe staffers:

We have great news to share for Boston.com. Hilary Sargent will be joining us full-time in January as a featured news writer and personality.

Hilary Sargent

Hilary Sargent

Hilary generated a lot of buzz in the past year when she created her own site, ChartGirl.com, that, in her words, sums up “complicated matters in easily digestible charts.” She created charts about local subjects such as Whitey Bulger’s Boston and Aaron Hernandez; nationally, she has tackled the feud between the Cheney sisters, the feuds of Donald Trump (a rather large chart), and the alleged relationships of Taylor Swift (an even larger chart).

Her work has appeared in places like Business Insider, Fast Company, Gawker, and here on Boston.com, where she created a version of ChartGirl specifically for us. Time.com named ChartGirl on of the 50 best websites of 2013, calling Hilary’s work full of “pithy substance.” Even the staid old Reader’s Digest named it one of its “sites we love.” She has a great presence on social media, both as Chartgirl and under her own byline./CONTINUES Read More

* Orange County Register owner Aaron Kushner is launching the Los Angeles Register, put out by the OCR staff. He says “it will be a daily newspaper of not quite the heft of the Orange County Register,” but larger than the Los Angeles Times. (ocregister.com)
hed
* Yum, bacon-wrapped scallops! (Never mind; that’s Capt. Bacon being disciplined.) (heraldnews.com) || Oops! It was “wrapped” in the print edition. (heraldnews.com) | Update: Esquire has the headline backstory. (esquire.com)
* The managing editor of TheTruthAboutGuns.com doesn’t discuss his pro-gun views with his family. “Better to leave an uncomfortable topic alone than get into the whole thing,” he says. (stltoday.com)
* Times-Picayune editor’s note says a story published Thursday “begins with a structure and includes some phrases that mirror a story [previously] published …the usage in this case did not meet our standards.” (nola.com/end of story)
* Bloomberg News editor-in-chief Matt Winkler rejects a proposal to lift the ban on writing about Mike Bloomberg. B(fortune.cnn.com)
* New York magazine editor Adam Moss tells journalism grads: “Eleven days ago, my employer announced that after 45 years of publishing a weekly magazine, New York was going to convert to a biweekly. This news found itself on the front page of the New York Times. Does the front page of the New York Times even matter anymore? I was shocked by how many people in this business didn’t even see it.” (capitalnewyork.com)
* Media Matters says its war on Fox News is over and “to a large extent, we won.” (huffingtonpost.com)
schools* A Fargo TV reporter was able to walk around three elementary schools without being stopped and now police are investigating her. (inforum.com) | The school district is making changes. (valleynewslive.com)
* Gawker: “Twitter quickly reverses a very stupid policy change.” (gawker.com)
* Yes, you can browse the web with a 27-year-old Apple computer. “Sure, it was slow as hell, but it worked! Data loaded, pages rendered, and links were clickable.” (keacher.com)