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Daily Archives: March 7, 2014

* Will Shortz (pictured): “Crosswords are a major source of income for [the New York Times],will which is something I’m proud of.” (capitalnewyork.com)
* Armed men in Crimea’s capital city steal equipment from Associated Press staffers. (ap.org)
* “I never considered going into cartooning professionally — who does that?” asks New Yorker cartoonist Tom Toro. (thebillfold.com)
* The Oregonian is leaving its longtime headquarters and moving into a new downtown space. (oregonlive.com)
* CNBC kills “The Kudlow Report.” (mediabistro.com)
* A rural weekly in Oregon is yours for $110,000. (“There’s a Dairy Queen across the street and a good Mexican restaurant a block away.”) (malheurenterprise.com)
* New York Times paywall changes revealed. (cjr.org)
* Boston Globe adds two opinion pages to its Sunday paper. (bostonglobemediapr.com)
* Stephen Colbert wins the late night talk show host popularity contest; Arsenio Hall loses. (thewrap.com)
* I’m guessing not many journalists at SXSW are paying $900/night to stay at the Courtyard Inn in Austin. (statesman.com)

“Student newspaper posting drug use photos on Social Media?” a Romenesko reader writes in an email. “Never heard of anything like this before. Curious what folks think about it. I’d prefer to pass this along anonymously.”

The Instagram user who sent me the link to the photos may have missed the Minnesota Daily story that tells more about the photos. I asked photographer Lisa Persson to explain how the shoots were arranged. She writes:

The photos were taken in different residence halls last weekend on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. The reporter and I were escorted into each residence hall by a known current resident. Once inside, the reporter and I walked down the halls and listened for activity in various rooms.

If we heard noises that we associated with partying or potential drug use (music, people talking about drinking, hearing bottles clinking, hearing lighters sparking, etc), we would knock on the door, explain the project, and ask if we could observe their activities and take photos for about ten minutes.

We also ensured them that if they agreed, their identities would be protected and their names would not be released. If we got permission, we would sit in the room with them to observe their activities, and I took pictures of any crime I saw occurring.

Editor-in-chief Anthony Wagner adds: “Given the sensitive nature of the photos, we also followed up with all the students a couple days later to get the consent and anonymity specifics in writing. …The director of University Relations called me yesterday to ask if the photos were authentic and get details about how we took them (consent, how we got in the res halls, etc). No one has contacted me asking for the students’ names.”

* Minnesota Daily’s Instagram photos (instagram.com) | View the slideshow (mndaily.com)
* Crime data shows that many dorms’ reputations hold true (mndaily.com)




Tina Brown is asked by Bloomberg Television what happens if Newsweek is wrong about Satoshi Nakamoto being the founder of bitcoin.

The former Newsweek editor’s response, according to a Bloomberg-provided transcript:

That would be rough. All I can think of is I’m so glad I’m not the editor. But actually, I’m very supportive of their desire to get a print product out. I actually always thought there should have been a print component to the digital Newsweek. A small print component.tinab But it is very hard. The ship has sailed. It really is a hard thing to bring it back. However, I do wish them well because I want every magazine that is out there to survive.

On the status of print media:

I think print media is obviously very beleaguered. But I do think With Newsweek having gone digital and come out of it — I think it is hard to relaunch it. It’s a very hard brand. I think weeklies are very hard.

On Newsweek charging $8 an issue and how to get consumers to pay for news:

It is very, very difficult. Even at The New Yorker in the ’90s I was confronting that challenge even before all of this which was by Monday, if you are publishing your magazine and coming out, the internet journalists, they all got the news early. So then you are publishing that is old, which is the only way to go is with depth, context, quality, which of course The New Yorker does. Newsweek’s whole DNA was about driving the weekly headlines and that is just extraordinary hard to pull off because the headlines are old by the time they come out.

* Video: What if Newsweek is wrong on bitcoin founder? (bloomberg.com)
* Video: Print has difficulty selling old news (bloomberg.com)

Update: Leah McGrath Goodman, the author of the Bitcoin piece, appeared on Bloomberg Television after Brown. (Questions about Brown start at the 4:20 mark.) This is from the transcript:

Leah McGrath Goodman: I FIND [TINA BROWN’S] COMMENTS NOT TO BE VERY FRIENDLY TO “NEWSWEEK.” I HAVE A PROBLEM WITH THE WAY SHE SPOKE ABOUT IT. THERE’S A BACK STORY TO THAT AND SHE KNOWS THERE IS ONE.

Bloomberg’s Tom Keene: MS. BROWN WAS BRIEFED ON THE STORY BEFORE IT WAS RELEASED TO THE PUBLIC?

Leah McGrath Goodman: OF COURSE NOT. AS A BACK STORY TO THE RELATIONSHIP WITH TINA BROWN AND “NEWSWEEK.” SHE’S NOT AN OBJECTIVE STORY.




A cop confronts Baltimore Sun photo editor Chris Assaf at a police-shooting scene
sun
“The Sun is posting all of Assaf’s images from the shooting scene as well as photos taken by Sun photographer Lloyd Fox, who witnessed and documented the incident. …The [police] department has opened an internal investigation.”

* In defense of the First Amendment (baltimoresun.com)

people
* What happens when readers select front page content. (blog.newswhip.com)
* Peter Bhatia leaves The Oregonian to teach at Arizona State University. There will be a national search for his replacement, says the publisher. (oregonlive.com) | (wweek.com)
* Bitcoin bat-craziness: “A Los Angeles Times reporter followed [Dorian Satoshi] Nakamoto into the elevator, where he made his impromptu denial. Eventually, she and 19 other reporters and photographers were escorted out of the building.” (latimes.com) | Man denies he’s the founder of bitcoin. (bigstory.ap.org)
* “Standing by our story,” says Newsweek editor Jim Impoco. (gawker.com)
patch* Patch’s new owner: “The difference between the old Patch and the new Patch is that we don’t have the pockets of a large corporation. We’ve got to run Patch… in a lean, entrepreneurial mode.” (streetfightmag.com)
* How Nate Silver hires FiveThirtyEight employees: “[He] judges potential employees by a set of coordinate axes he has saved on his computer.” (time.com)
* Hartford Courant columnist Rick Green leaves the paper for the University of Vermont Foundation. He tells readers: “Despite all the [news industry] changes and all the doomsayers, people will always listen when there is a compelling story to be told.” (courant.com)
* The four photographers who’ve been rehired by the Sun-Times are now called “multimedia journalists.” (chicagoreader.com)
* Lagniappe, an Alabama bi-weekly paper, has fired reporter Katie Nichols for fabricated stories. She also apparently lied about her education. (lagniappemobile.com) | She then did some reporting for Al.com. “Katie Nichols was employed by Alabama Media Group for three weeks. She is no longer with the company,” says content vice president Michelle Holmes.
* El Diario boss denies union’s intimidation claims. (capitalnewyork.com)
* Retired Worcester Telegram & Gazette editor Harry Whitin is no longer interested in buying the paper from Red Sox/Globe owner John Henry. (telegram.com)
* Members of an Alaska co-op complain that Ms. Magazine is too political. (newsminer.com)