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Daily Archives: March 17, 2014

food
Chicago Tribune food writer Kevin Pang posts and tweets: “Found in kitchen of prominent Chicago restaurant: Instructions on what to do if you spot a food writer.”

Pang tells me he’s not going to identify the eatery because “that would put attention to that one place, when in fact many restaurants around town do the same.” He adds: “This example is actually pretty mild. I’ve heard of chefs hiring private investigators to take pictures of food critics at home.”


* Mitch McConnell‘s campaign won’t let LEO Weekly news editor Joe Sonka attend a press conference and calls Louisville police to make sure he doesn’t sneak in. (courier-journal.com)
* Sonka: “I know the GOP seems rather fond of Putin’s leadership style these days, but this seems excessive, no?” (@joesonka)
weather* Why meteorologists can’t wear green on St. Patrick’s Day. (@FoxMariaMolina)
* “Data are” or “data is”? FiveThirtyEight goes with the latter. (fivethirtyeight.com) | Rem Rieder on FiveThirtyEight’s launch: (usatoday.com) | The archives include work from Nate Silver‘s New York Times days. (capitalnewyork.com)
* Survey: 33% of respondents report following the news throughout the day. (americanpressinstitute.org) | News consumers are still interested in “meaty” items. (bigstory.ap.org)
* Henry Blodget critiques Michael Wolff‘s piece on Business Insider, and cites “several incorrect facts.” (businessinsider.com)
* Marc Andreessen: The other guy in every Michael Wolff column is “an idiot, incompetent, mendacious, and probably a fraud.” (@pmarca)
* Why are rich guys buying media properties? (jacklimpert.com)
* A USA Today College editor explains why she passed on a story about students making porn. (ajr.org)
* Albany Newspaper Guild endorses an anti-workplace bullying bill. (albanyguild.org)
* Deadline Detroit announces layoffs and payless paydays. (deadlinedetroit.com)

My tipster who requests anonymity writes: “Daily Mail quotes Slade.com. They even copyrighted it!”

Daily Mail graphic:

slade

copyright* Hijackers plunged to 5,000 ft and used low altitude ‘terrain masking’ maneuver (with “Slade” graphic) (dailymail.co.uk)
* The 634 runways where the Malaysian Airlines flight could have landed (slate.com)

Today’s NPR “Tell Me More” guests discussed new media startups’ lack of diversity. Journal-isms publisher Richard Prince said:

“The files are just bulging with examples of cases in which people of color have been left out or misrepresented in stories and perspectives, and we don’t want this to continue in these new startups as well …

Richard Prince

Richard Prince

“One thing that’s a little troubling is that these young people are starting these startups without very much diversity, and we’ve been at this [emphasizing the importance of diversity] for quite a while, and for this to be 2014 and still having this problem with the younger people is kind of troubling. …

“But I will say this: while I was sitting here waiting to go on, Bill Keller – who is the former executive editor of the New York Times, and has one of the startups, about the criminal justice system – messages me, saying [Prince reads Keller’s email]:

The criminal justice system, which will be the focus of our reporting, touches people of color disproportionately, as is distressingly evident from the population of our overstuffed prisons, the profiles of the victims and the impact on families and communities. there is clear journalistic advantage in building a staff that understands and can get that story.

“So he’s one of the old school people, and he’s much more forceful on this issue than the new people.”

* Media startups short on diversity (npr.org) | h/t @jfdulac
* Earlier: J-startups aren’t a revolution if they’re filled with white men (theguardian.com)

oleader
I asked the Union Leader about today’s Irish touch and got this response from publisher Joe McQuaid:

My guess is that we first used the Union O’Leader on a St. Patrick’s Day back in the 1970s when William Loeb was publisher. It fell out of style at some point thereafter with purists (not I) who didn’t like monkeying with the nameplate. In recent times, if we fail to run it, we get calls of complaint. So it has been back for at least a few years now.

Now, help me out with shamrocks. We had a “find the shamrock” contest in the paper today and I’m catching hell for the use of a four-leaf clover as the shamrock.

* PDF of today’s New Hampshire Union O’Leader (newseum.org)
* Difference between a shamrock and a four-leaf clover (forrent.com)

New York Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr.’s total compensation in 2013 was $5.3 million – down from $6.9 million the year before, reports Joe Pompeo.
times
Other 2013 pay figures from the just-released Times Company 2014 proxy statement:
* CEO Mark Thompson – $4.6 million
* Vice chairman Michael Golden – just under $2 million
* Chief financial officer Jim Follo – $1.8 million
* General counsel Kenneth Richieri – $1.3 million

* Arthur Sulzberger’s compensation took a hit in 2013 (capitalnewyork.com)


- WSJ's chandelier (left) and its skeletal remains.

– WSJ’s chandelier (left) and its skeletal remains.

The Wall Street Journal’s chandelier was reportedly loved by former CEO Lex Fenwick. He’s gone – and so is the chandelier. (“Heard it was entirely down now,” a Journal source tells me this morning.)

* WSJ’s quirky 7th-floor chandelier is coming down (facebook.com)

Earlier on jimromenesko.com:
* The Journal’s chandelier is coming down now that the CEO has been ousted
* “Gaudy and expensive” chandelier sends the wrong message to staff

* Newsday asks readers to pick the editorials they love to hate. (newsday.com)
* Miami Herald loses publisher David Landsberg to Goodwill Industries. (miamiherald.com)
* The man identified by Newsweek as the creator of bitcoin hires a lawyer “to clear my name” and says “I unconditionally denygot the Newsweek report.” (latimes.com)
* The story behind the “Bulgogi?” ad in the New York Times. (npr.org)
* Los Angeles Times fires reporter Jason Felch for an inappropriate relationship with a source. (nytimes.com) | (latimes.com)
* Reuters responds to a New York Times story about its use of a teenage photographer in Syria. (petapixel.com)
* Roger Yu on the rise of data journalism: (usatoday.com)
* Why you should rip the mailing labels off your magazines. (forbes.com)
* Vogue readers don’t want a “real person” on the cover, says editor Alexandra Shulman. (telegraph.co.uk)
* Detroit journalist Charlie LeDuff, formerly of the New York Times, won’t be charged for his 2013 St. Patrick’s Day antics. (freep.com)
* Claim: “These days, you can’t win Pulitzers and cover City Hall at the same time.” (journoterroist.com)
* New York Times columnist Andrew Ross Sorkin is writing a finance drama for Showtime. (latimes.com) | Alex Pareene: “This is not going to be a show that will cause anyone in Wall Street to cancel their Showtime.” (salon.com)
* Michael Luo tells college students that the New York Times is “not the easiest place to say you’re a Christian.” (theblaze.com)
* Lauren Ashburn: I was once told I couldn’t wear my cross necklace on the air. (foxnews.com)
* Michael Wolff: Sites like Business Insider are running after the market instead of creating one. (usatoday.com)
five* Nate Silver‘s FiveThirtyEight launches today. (facebook.com/fivethirtyeight)
* Interviewly nicely organizes and repackages Reddit AMAs. (interviewly.com)
* Wayne Knight – aka Newman from “Seinfeld” – is not dead. (laobserved.com)