Afternoon Report for April 18, 2014

* Tracee Herbaugh recalls her late mother – the first woman AP bureau chief to die while on assignment – and writes: “I’d become annoyed at people who assumed I would follow in my mother’s footsteps and pursue journalism. And yet, I did.” (washingtonpost.com)
* U.S. newspaper industry revenue fell 2.6% in 2013. (AP via washingtonpost.com)
* “People with money are excited about the news business.” (theatlantic.com)
murrow* “I believe that Edward R. Murrow (left) would have embraced our selection of Arianna Huffington as this year’s [Murrow Forum] speaker” at Tufts University. (tuftsdaily.com)
* “Freedom is choosing not to live behind the locked door,” says the man who shared his passwords with the world. (onthemedia.org)
* Nina Totenberg recalls being ignored in the newsroom at the start of her career because “I was not one of the guys.” (medium.com)
* More on Rutgers athletic director Julie Hermann and her classroom remarks about the Star-Ledger. (Raritan River Review)
* The prestigious Clark Medal goes to a University of Chicago economist who studies media bias. (wsj.com) | Prof. Matthew Gentzkow talks to NPR. (npr.org)
* Media bias, dammit! The Bush pregnancy was ignored! (@newsbusters)

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