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Daily Archives: June 5, 2014

I spent some time today browsing through old magazines at the Marquette University and City of Milwaukee libraries. My most amusing find was a LOOK magazine article from 1968 predicting life in 2018. The “top-rank, cautious scientists” tapped for this piece believed that “the kids now in Head Start programs…will be running the nation.” Wars in 2018, they said, “may become less gory” with “battles fought 20,000 feet under the sea or between unmanned satellites in outer space.” looklogo2018intro

A few lucky families will make $50,000 a year
cheapsub

Drugs will be able to make men gay or sad
newdrugs

We’ll even have shoe box-sized computers
spying

Technology will cause a loss of privacy
priv

* LOOK magazine cover for May 28, 1968 (ebay.com)

John Mancini is leaving the Associated Press after three years to become NBC News director of digital newsgathering.

From: Verdi, David (NBCUniversal)
Sent: Thursday, June 05, 2014 2:50 PM
To: @NBC Uni News Everyone
Subject: Staff Announcement from David Verdi

As we continue the transformation of NBC Newsgathering, I am pleased to announce that John Mancini will join the Hub as Director, Digital Newsgathering. In this newly created role, John will report to me and partner with Naomi Karam, Adrienne Mong, our brands and units to ensure the Hub’s global resources are truly integrated across our digital, broadcast and cable platforms.

John Mancini

John Mancini

He will focus on shaping our journalism to uniquely serve our digital consumers. This is the next step in our transformation to creating content for all our users and viewers no matter how they choose to get their news.

John comes to us from the AP where he was Global News Manager at “The Nerve Center,” which plans and executes the AP’s daily news reports across all formats. John is also the creator of “10 Things to Know,” one of the AP’s most viewed and shared mobile features worldwide.

Please join me in welcoming John to NBC News.

David

Also announced today: The Wire’s Dashiell Bennett is promoted to editor, while Eric Levenson is leaving The Wire to join Boston.com.

Kingston (NY) Daily Freeman’s Ivan Lajara saw the Newspaper Journalism Glossary that I linked to in Wednesday’s Morning Report and came up with something more creative.

“I grabbed the terms, took out the meanings and put mine in some of those,” he writes in an email. “It took about an hour, though I added links later. Some things just happen like that.”

Here are just some of the Freeman Life section editor’s definitions:

AP: A wire service that moves a story after everyone else is done tweeting about it.
Bias: A story that’s not slanted the way you wanted.
Circulation: An arrow going down.
Conflict of Interest: White House Correspondents Dinner.
Editor: Angry White Man.
Freelancer: Reporter without health insurance.
Jump: The part of the story where everyone stops reading.
Layout: Something not done in your newsroom anymore.
Mug: The worst possible photo of a person that will become the only photo that is used for that person.
Scoop: Likely inconsequential, if true.
Sidebar: Information reporters didn’t know how to fit in a story, so they wrote another one.
Subhead: Smaller typos.

Lajara welcomes contributions. Post your terms in comments here or on his site.

* News jargon, explained (dailyfreeman.blogspot.com)


This is from an Institute for Family Studies Q & A with New York Times columnist Ross Douthat (pictured here):

Institute for Family Studies: It seems fair to say that those who report and opine on family issues in major media outlets hail, by and large, from stable,ross well-off families, and they themselves are highly educated, got married in their late twenties or thirties, and have few or no children. How do you think their background and current family life shape how they write about marriage and family issues today?

Ross Douthat: I’m not sure it’s right to suggest that most or many journalists writing about these issues “have few or no children.” A lot of them (us!) do have kids — sometimes even in above-average numbers!

To the extent that there’s any association between journalism and childlessness, I wonder if it hasn’t been created by the recent, internet-driven youth movement in punditry, which has elevated a lot of folks (myself included, of course) to prominent writing perches at an age when they are less likely – especially given upper-class patterns of delayed marriage – to be married with kids. In which case it might be technically true that somewhat fewer prominent journalists (and maybe especially liberal journalists, since reactionaries tend to reproduce a little earlier) have kids or multiple kids than in the recent past, but it also might be a temporary phenomenon.

* Ross Douthat on family structure, pop culture and more (family-studies.org)

Update: Read what my Facebook friends/subscribers say about this

Wednesday:
tweet
Thursday:

* Philadelphia Inquirer apologizes for sex crime tweet (phillymag.com)
* Apology tweet coming in 3…. 2…. 1 (gamedayr.com)
* Special ed teacher accused of having sex with student (philly.com)

* “I always thought that one of the more compelling things you could ever cover in New York was sin,” says the New York Times city editor who developed the sin and vices beat. (observer.com)
* Vice Media is targeted by the law firm that sued Conde Nast for using unpaid interns. (capitalnewyork.com)amazon
* A Michigan freelancer gets $60 for a post with 1 million views so far. (detroitnews.com)
* Conde Nast is getting into the higher education business. (npr.org)
* Keep up the good work, SaveYouAClick‘s Jake Beckman! (His slogan: “Saving you from clickbait and adding context since 2014.”) (blogs.reuters.com)
* Wired is hosting a $4,500 two-day retreat. (wwd.com)
* A just-released report on media credentialing practices in the United States: (dmlp.org) | Highlights and commentary from CJR: (cjr.org)
* Rachel Maddow wrongly accused the Pentagon of fabricating the Jessica Lynch hero tale. (Media Myth Alert)
* “I’m not just mad at Amazon,” says Stephen Colbert. “I’m mad at Amazon Prime. …Watch out Bezos, this means war.” (publishersmarketplace.com) | (nytimes.com)
* Writers should be treated like plumbers, who never work for free. (medium.com)
* Orange County Register owner Aaron Kushner‘s PowerPoint pitch to investors. (ocweekly.com)
* Is it time to hit the panic button at the Register? (dankennedy.net)
* A journalism student graduates from Temple U. on May 15 and is reporting from Syria a week later. (temple.edu)
* The Daily Beast makes leadership changes after its CEO announces she’s moving to Dublin. (capitalnewyork.com)
* Board members at newspaper chain Lee Enterprises give themselves 10,000 shares of stock – a gift worth over $40,000 per director. (lee.net)