Archive

Daily Archives: June 26, 2014

-- NPR

— NPR

- Politico (left) and Washington Post

— Politico (left) and Washington Post

Frank Bi writes in an email:

I noticed a lot of newsrooms were tweeting photos of their offices watching the game, and thought I would aggregate them together on a webpage. I made a shout-out on Twitter and also spent some time searching on Twitter during the match and managed to pull together more than 30 photos from newsrooms (and two from Google I/O which I counted since the photos were taken by tech journalists at the conference).

If there’s any newsrooms I’m missing, I’d love to add them to the page — they can either send it to me (frank@frankbi.com) or contribute on Github via pull request (github.com/frankbi/worldcup-newsrooms).

* Newsrooms watching USA vs. Germany (frankbi.github.io)

Fox Newser Howard Kurtz tweeted yesterday that he was going on “The O’Reilly Factor” to discuss whether Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart are slipping in influence and ratings.

- O'Reilly, Ashburn and Kurtz

– O’Reilly, Ashburn and Kurtz

Gee, I thought, that should be interesting. I wonder if he’ll say the Comedy Central stars and frequent Fox News critics are on the top of the world.

He didn’t.

Kurtz: “Jon Stewart’s peak of influence was really when Iraq was out of control during the Bush administration, and now that Iraq is in chaos he’s getting to beat up on Dick Cheney again. But neither of these guys goes very hard after President Obama. The humor is very gentle when it happens, and that’s kind of taken them out of the zeitgeist.”

Lauren Ashburn: “I’m not sure about that, Howard. I don’t think you’re quite right there. Look at all the scandals that have happened under the Obama administration. You have the IRS scandal, the VA scandal, Iraq in chaos, and let’s not forget about Obamacare. They went really hard on Obama about that.”

Kurtz: “Really hard?”

Bill O’Reilly: “No, I didn’t see it, Lauren. I mean, maybe you’re watching a closed-circuit broadcast, because they do edit those programs.”

* Transcript: Are Stewart and Colbert changing their tone? (foxnews.com)


Editors at Simon Fraser University’s The Peak asked about 40 professors if they’d read the negative reviews they got on RateMyProfessors.com for a Jimmy Kimmel-inspired video; only 9 agreed to do it.

meanreviews

[Above] unidentified prof: “Most arrogant and intellectual dishonest professor I’ve met.”

Other Simon Fraser professors in the video:
Stephen Collis: “Bah, I found this course to be tediously boring and useless, although he is a very nice guy.”
Nicky Didicher: “She will mock your aspirations then cackle over the remains of your spirit.”
Kathleen Burke: “If you want to get a good grade, avoid her or you will get sadness.”
Enda Brophy: “Before I attended his class, I thought he was a woman prof.”
Zorana Svedic: “Good lecturer, ugly shoes.”
Peter Tingling: “He’s hot in during the lecture, but after lecture he’s super cold.”
Bryan Jones: “Bryan is terrible at explaining material. Don’t let his stunning good looks and humor fool you into thinking this is an easy course.”

Multimedia editor Brandon Hillier tells Romenesko readers:

We initially contacted quite a few professors, and had many people decline. But we managed to gather 9 professors, all of whom were really enthusiastic about the idea.

People that refused to take part cited reasons ranging from the idea being “not funny,” to not wanting to be associated with Rate My Professor. After speaking with a few of them, RMP is a bit of a black sheep topic within the higher education community.

* Professors read mean reviews about themselves (the-peak.ca) | It’s on YouTube, too (youtube.com)
* Paper’s staff “thought it would be a clever idea” (globalnews.ca)


I believe she’s referring to this:shittonmoney

My tipster writes: “Reporter’s last story — she thought the editors would change the headline — which they did, but apparently the URL remained.”

Eva Ruth Moravec, who left the Express-News to go to grad school, tells Romenesko readers:

The headline was my worst joke ever, and on my last day at the Express-News. It was changed before the story was published, but the URL was created sometime during the editing process, which I didn’t anticipate. I’ve apologized to the Express-News, an extremely loving newsroom that was my family for six years.

Any last-day-of-work pranks you care to share? Post in comments or email me.

* The headline was changed; the URL wasn’t (expressnews.com)

* Orange County Register owner Aaron Kushner set himself up for failure, says OC Weekly. (ocweekly.com)
* A Washington Post editor tells CJR: “I think [Jeff] Bezos wants us to be everything for everyone, the same way Amazon is.” (cjr.org)
* GE is now a legitimate online news publisher. (digiday.com)
* Cole Bartiromo, founder of Newsball (“uncensored investigative news stories exposing ANYONE”), “says he doesn’t want to be a journalist and that’s probably a good thing. He’s not very good at reporting.” (thedailybeast.com)writing
* [At right] Ken Layne interviews Steve Coulter. (kenlayne.com)
* Landscaping or journalism? Peter Nickeas chose the latter, and now he’s covering Chicago crime from 10 p.m. to 8 a.m. (chicagoreader.com)
* SPJ president David Cuillier: “If anyone thinks I am unethical, secretive or raiding SPJ coffers, I would be happy to talk about it.” (spjnetwork.org)
* Some belt-tightening at Conde Nast after a less-than-spectacular first half of 2014. (wwd.com)
* “Freaky”: Meet the world’s first news-reading androids. (washingtonpost.com)
* Laid-off Wall Street Journal editor John Seeley tells colleagues: “The corporate belt-tighteners have decided that it would be best for the company if I were squeezed out.” (capitalnewyork.com)
* The Fleet Street tabloids era has been over for some time, says Financial Times. (ft.com)