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Daily Archives: August 4, 2014

* Ken Doctor has five questions about Tribune Publishing, and wonders if Gannett will be the next to spin off its newspapers. (niemanlab.org) | (niemanlab.org)
* Report: Gannett’s buying out the other companies that own Cars.com for $1.8 billion. (bloomberg.com)
speed* Auto writer Patrick George spends three days in jail after driving a little too fast. “I’m writing this piece because at Jalopnik we believe in being transparent and owning up to our mistakes.” (jalopnik.com)
* How NPR handles story-removal requests. (npr.org)
* Mike Nizza quits Esquire to edit Bloomberg’s politics site. (capitalnewyork.com)
* Louisville’s LEO Weekly is without an editorial staff after its last two writers walk out. (insiderlouisville.com)
* Petition-signers write “eloquent and moving” comments about James Risen. (cjr.org)
* Marijuana legalization would boost media stocks higher. (usatoday.com)

Twice a year I see half-page ads in the Daily Northwestern inviting students to apply to get into Alex Kotlowitz’s popular writing course. After reading David Carr’s course description on Medium this morning, I wondered how Boston University is picking students for the New York Times media columnist’s class. I got an answer from Tom Fiedler, dean of BU’s College of Communication:

David’s course, like Alex’s at Northwestern, required students to apply, which included an essay making their case to be included. The class is limited to 12 seniors or graduate students and it drew many times that number in applications. I think David’s course outline and syllabus are the best I have ever seen — an excellent demonstration of the utility of Medium and, of course, his own, unique writing style.

Although David hasn’t yet submitted his outline for the course he will teach next spring, he seems inclined to focus it more on directed discussions about the changing media eco-system, not unlike his Media Matters columns. I only wish that I could sign up….

Update — Carr emails: “Students submitted written samples that we went through with an eye toward voice and creating a good mix. I’m happy for the bunch we have, a brave group of souls who are willing to serve as a beta for a newbie prof who may or may not know what he is doing. If things don’t work out, maybe I will have to put on a sandwich board next time out and walk up and down Commonwealth Ave. begging for students.”

BU apparently bent the 12-student rule; Carr says he has 11 graduate students and four undergrads for the fall semester.

* Carr: “If you don’t show up for class, you will flounder” (medium.com)
* “So jealous of my friends taking David Carr’s class” (@Kirkpatrick_SJ)


Toledo’s WTVG-TV invited viewers to submit their photos of the city’s contaminated water for posting. At least one person turned to a National Geographic item from 2013 for his or her submission. The photo was removed after Romenesko reader Mike Brice tweeted this.
greenphoto
The source:
natgeo

* From 2013: Extreme algae blooms expanding worldwide (nationalgeographic.com)

- From Dan's Papers

– From Dan’s Papers

This Dan’s Papers police blotter item was all over social media yesterday, and followed up today with another fake piece about the “chaos” caused by this “crime.” Newsweek’s Zach Schonfeld points out:

There is no such “reality TV star” named Sergio Eisalat. The blurb bears no mention of the TV show he stars in, a Google search for his name brings up no results older than yesterday, and German journalist Ralph Pfister notes on Twitter that “Eisalat” is a literal German translation of “egg salad.” Then there’s the fact that the story is suspiciously similar to Woody Allen’s 1966 comedy What’s Up, Tiger Lily?, in which a secret agent is hired to hunt down the stolen “world’s greatest egg salad recipe.”

The receptionist at Dan’s Papers says editorial director Eric Feil isn’t taking calls because today is production day and he’s too busy. Sure.

* Are Hamptons police really searching for a stolen egg salad recipe? (newsweek.com)
* Reality TV personality’s reward causes chaos (danspapers.com)

NPR’s “All Things Considered” is doing a piece this week on young newspaper carriers and asking former paperboys/girls to post their photos on Instagram with the #nprpaper hashtag. That’s NPR newsman Jamie McIntyre’s father – not Jamie, as my first version said – with his Houston Chronicle bag in the photo below. (I delivered the Beloit (Wis.) Daily News for three years and bought a Polaroid Swinger with my earnings, but never snapped a photo of my bike and the huge baskets that held my 70-plus papers.)

Photo via NPR on Instagram

Photo via NPR on Instagram

* NPR: Did you deliver the paper as a kid? (instagram.com)


* Miami Herald’s Carol Rosenberg on covering Gitmo: “One of the most challenging, at times frustrating, rarely boring, and bedrock fundamentally important beats in American journalism.” (miamiherald.com)
brian* Brian Williams is trying too hard to be funny. (buzzfeed.com)
* Williams reports his daughter’s “Peter Pan” gig. “We didn’t think he’d go there,” says an NBC official. (nydailynews.com)
* James Surowiecki: “The [Time Warner] deal makes a lot more strategic sense than many of Murdoch’s previous ones.” (newyorker.com)
* Finally, some praise for journalism education: (vox.com)
* The University of Texas at Austin is making some students pay to access its “first-class network.” (insidehighered.com)
* Gordon Crovitz: “Granting bureaucrats control over the Internet would undermine the world’s greatest engine of innovation.” (wsj.com)
* John Strubel: “Sometimes being first is a liability.” (Six typos in five sentences of a USA Today story.) (johnstrubel.com)typos
* David Carr travels to Rio de Janeiro to interview Glenn Greenwald, who says: ““No one, not The New York Times, no one, is entitled to an audience. The ability to thrive is directly dependent upon your ability to convince people that you’re providing something valuable and unique.” (nytimes.com)
* What Carr’s Boston University class is about: (medium.com)
* Jay Mathews calls B.S. on New Republic’s Ivy League schools piece. (washingtonpost.com)
* Tribune Publishing debuts on the New York Stock Exchange Tuesday under the symbol TPUB. (nytimes.com) | (matthewkeys.net)
* Deadspin, we have a problem. (shermanreport.com)
* NBC’s David Gregory headed to CNN? (pagesix.com)
* New Orleans Advocate reacts to rival Times-Picayune’s “bonus” print editions announcement: (@PKovacs7)
* NPR’s Scott Simon has a bad experience on United. (Join the club!) (@nprscottsimon) | More tweets about the flight on @nprscottsimon.

amused

* Sonny Rollins: In his own words (newyorker.com) | h/t @pottsmark
* This piece is defended by some of my Facebook friends (facebook.com)