Morning Report for September 2, 2014

* Katharine Weymouth is stepping down as Washington Post publisher. Fred Ryan, a former Reagan administration official who helped launch Politico, will succeed her. (washingtonpost.com) | Weymouth’s farewell memo to staff: (jimromenesko.com)
high* “There’s a feeling like now is our time in the sun,” says High Times magazine’s editor-in-chief. (washingtonpost.com)
* New York Times didn’t have a Robin Williams obit in the can because “he seemed hale, he had boundless energy and he was far younger than those who typically command our attention.” (nytimes.com)
* Emily Bell: We can’t let Facebook and Twitter make editorial decisions on our behalf. (theguardian.com)
* How ESPN’s story on Michael Sam‘s locker room shower habits got on the air. (si.com)
* Author Neal Pollack [hearts] Amazon. (slate.com)
* Sharon Waxman to the New York Times: Who cares if the bride is keeping her name!? (thewrap.com)
* Some publications – Forbes, for example – have more contributors than paid staff. “That’s a gamble.” (cjr.org)
* Claim: This is the golden age of investigative journalism. (tomdispatch.com)
* Veteran Los Angeles Times investigative journalist Robert J. Lopez heads to Cal State’s PR department. (laobserved.com)
* “Confusion and uncertainty seems to be rampant” at the downsized CNN. (capitalnewyork.com)
* Meet David Muir, the new anchor of ABC World News Tonight.” (nytimes.com)
lay* NPR staffers get some help with lie/lay. (npr.org)
* For a freelance writer, seeing a publication’s pay rate stay the same over 10 years as opposed to it declining “is practically winning the lottery.” (bostonglobe.com)
* Frank Catalano on what happens when you quit Facebook. (geekwire.com)

Comments

comments