Morning Report for October 28, 2014

* The top three newspapers by circulation are USA Today, Wall Street Journal and New York Times. (chicagotribune.com)
* David Gregory is joining Katie Couric on Yahoo for an election special. (nytimes.com)
* Seattle Times blasts the FBI for putting a fake news story on a fake Seattle Times website. “Not only does that cross a line, it erases it,” says editor Kathy Best. (seattletimes.com)
* Chicago Sun-Times is launching a “mobile-first app network.” CEO Tim Knight says “this innovation … begins an exciting new chapter for the Sun-Times brand.” (robertfeder.com) | (suntimes.com)
* “The odds of major success are long,” Ken Doctor says of the Sun-Times network. (niemanlab.org)
fired* Nassau County D.A. threatens 5 Towns Jewish Times over a link to a “factual” New York Observer story. (observer.com)
* Report: Tampa Tribune has fired controversial conservative columnist Douglas MacKinnon. (cltampa.com)
* “I don’t think there has ever been a better time to be journalist, especially a young journalist starting out,” says Brian Stelter. “The flip side of that, there has never been a more unpredictable time.” (downtowndevil.com)
* The Bobby Harrell case in South Carolina shows why local accountability reporting matters. (cjr.org)
* Washington Post creates the Ben Bradlee Award for Courage in Journalism. (washingtonpost.com)
* Len Shapiro: “Very little has been written about Bradlee’s great affection for sports, and yes, even some sportswriters.” (shermanreport.com)
* Ebola and “a big-time journalistic juggling act.” (usatoday.com) | (Joe Strupp)
* R.L. Stine will be writing a story live on Twitter tonight. (@RL_Stine)
* Poynter’s Tampa Bay Times isn’t commenting on layoffs. (bizjournals.com)
* Newseum exec Paul Sparrow says “the next generation of news/media companies must deliver critical or entertaining information customized for a specific person based on their location, job, relationship status, interests, contacts and eventually, even their mood.” (ajr.org)
* New York Times standards editor Phil Corbett isn’t a fan of channeling one’s inner something-or-other. (nytimes.com)

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