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Daily Archives: November 11, 2014

New Haven’s recently formed Perception Task Force aims to get positive coverage of the city in the New Haven Register and other news outlets. The mayor’s spokesman is assigned to “develop a stable of positive City focused stories to funnel to media to discourage sensational crime stories.”

City officials insist crime is down, but say that’s not reflected in news stories.
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“There is an internal bias in a downsized media to do one big negative story every Monday,” a task force member tells the New Haven Independent.

Mayor Toni Harp and others met with New Haven Register publisher Kevin Corrado “to get his buy-in that the perception of the city is important” and “how they write stories about the city is important.” The Register’s coverage of the the city, says Independent editor Paul Bass, “leans toward the boosterish in covering civic/business leaders while way overplaying crime and freaking out people.”

The Independent reports:

In an email, Corrado declined to comment on the specific items discussed at the meeting. “We are always open to feedback and discussion from officials and other residents,” he wrote. “It helps inform our news coverage of New Haven and other communities.”

Records of a later task force meeting on Sept. 3 indicated that media coverage is “steady and positive.” There are “no glaring red flags.”

Rich Scinto, who covered crime for the Register from the end of 2012 until September of this year, says “the entire city desk staff was in my opinion extremely fair with its coverage of the city” and “the Register has and continues to cover crime fairly and doesn’t attempt to sensationalize it.”

He adds: “To the New Haven Perception Study Task Force I say the perception problem of New Haven is incredibly important and I hope the group has luck, but you don’t have to go seeking the ‘buy-in’ of the paper; it’s already there.”

* Perception task force targets city’s reputation (newhavenindependent.org)

Howard Stern is a big fan of Fox News personality Anna Kooiman (“the really hot one”) and praises Roger Ailes for taking her out of the kickboxing studio and putting her on the news set.

Stern said on his SiriusXM radio show today:

"The new Hugh Hefner"

“The new Hugh Hefner”

Roger Ailes is the new Hugh Hefner, I’ve decided. The guy’s got a whole posse of hot newswomen and he’s a genius. ..He doesn’t even go to broadcast schools, he doesn’t go to journalism departments [to find] all the female anchors – at least the hot ones, and there’s a ton of them. ..

It’s like, “Fuck broadcast school! And fuck journalism! Get me that girl from Turbo Kick who came in number one – not number two, number one – and put her in the tightest dress we can get, and let her read the goddamned teleprompter. And when she has a problem, let her throw it to some dude or whatever, or some ugly chick who can read.” …

And like Hugh Hefner, he’s an older man, not particularly the best-looking guy. But he knows how to spot talent, this guy. …He should start a Fox Mansion – a Fox TV Mansion – [where] he walks around in a bathrobe.

In 2009, journalists at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel started donating to United Way through the Milwaukee Newspaper Guild. “Some people didn’t want to give through the company given how the companyunitedway had forced us to take a pay cut and then laid people off,” says local Guild president and Journal Sentinel Packers reporter Tom Silverstein.

“We had some success with the effort and kept it going,” he tells Romenesko readers. “It’s getting more notice this year because [Journal Communications CEO] Steve Smith just sent out a letter asking us to donate through the company after eliminating 16 jobs. So [the give-through-the-Guild program ] is not new, but it’s gotten a little boost from the recent events.”

* “The Journal Sentinel buildings are like a ghost town” (urbanmilwaukee.com)
* Earlier: Care to give to United Way before losing your job? (jimromenesko.com)


posturls

New York Post readers who checked the tabloid’s website before 9 a.m. Monday saw the headline, “Osama bin Laden died like a pussy.” Just after 9, readers were told the al-Qaeda leader died like a “wimp.”

“However, the URL still contained the offending [p-]word,” notes a Romenesko reader. “Sometime during the date, they changed the URL, too. It is currently [this]. As a web editor myself I can tell you that changing the URL even more than changing the hed indicates that this was a BFD [big fucking deal] internally, because if you change your URL you lose lots of inbound Google News traffic.”

My tipster, who asks not to be named (“I work for a corporation so I have no personal opinions!”), continues:

I’ll close by noting that the point is that even the NY Post apparently has words which they will not print.nyp Whoever wrote that hed and whoever runs the site found that out today.

Personally, I believe the newspapers should reflect the way people talk in the real world, not uphold some prissy concept of what might make polite people turn away in revulsion. As if anyone over the age of eight has never heard these words. So actually I’m in favor of the Post vs. the NYT on the issue of Carlinesque words.

I’m trying to get someone from the Post to comment.

* Osama bin Laden died like a wimp | …or a pussy (nypost.com)

against

“Journalism students? You might want to rethink that head,” writes tipster Sandy Hingston.

* Speak out for sexual assault (temple-news.com)

* Cleveland.com asks readers how they want Black Friday covered. The commenters don’t disappoint. (cleveland.com)
* WMUR’s James Pindell has been MIA since apologizing to Scott Brown for his debate question. (The news director didn’t respond to my Monday email.) (miscellanyblue.com) | Silent on Twitter: (@JamesPindell)
* “What I did was horrible,” says Stephen Glass, “and then asking people to defend me was horrible.” (newrepublic.com)
* Read Washington Post executive editor Marty Baron‘s ICFJ awards dinner speech. (washingtonpost.com)
* Reuters TV is targeting 30- to 40-year-old “realists” who “need to be in the know.” (digiday.com)
doobie* Washington Post blasts the FBI for impersonating reporters. (washingtonpost.com) | Jack Shafer: Why cops shouldn’t fake being reporters. (reuters.com)
* [Right] NY1’s Pat Kiernan gives “a slight edge” to the News cover. (@patkiernan)
* Matt Buchanan: “If there is a magazine worth paying for, it’s probably The New Yorker.” (theawl.com) | New Yorker’s paywall returns. (newyorker.com)
* “The New Yorker Presents” is coming to Amazon Instant Video. (comingsoon.net via @alexweprin)
* Washington Post finds “problematic” sourcing in five Fareed Zakaria columns. (washingtonpost.com)
* OK, NewsOK: “Gallery of famous black men who only knock up white women.” (@McNeill_Tweets)
* Noted: The New York Times is not for sale. (nypost.com)
* Scripps shut down Knoxville alt-weekly Metro Pulse even though it wasn’t losing money. Was it because the paper was too edgy? (cjr.org)
* Andrew Golis on BuzzFeed as a listicle generator and a serious news outlet. (medium.com)
* When Paul Krugman writes like a Chicago sportswriter. (chicagoreader.com)
* “Sparkling prose” in the New York Times. (nytimes.com)
* NPR’s been posting about two corrections a day. (npr.org)
* The so-called “Selfie Stalker” sues Nancy Grace. (westword.com)
* Yes, time flies. (Thanks, Sree.) (@sree)
* Tampa Tribune lays off political reporter William March. He’d been with the paper for 30 years. (saintpetersblog.com)