Morning Report for November 17, 2014

* “Great journalists are difficult,” a source tells Lloyd Grove for his First Look Media piece, “and I don’t think many people appreciate that the best journalists are also the hardest to manage.” (thedailybeast.com)
* StoryCorps founder David Isay wins the $1 million TED prize. (nytimes.com)
* “Unlike many who are born, live, and die in poverty, I got where I am today through my own efforts,” writes retired Washington Post Pulitzer-winner William McPherson. “I can’t blame anyone else.” (iasc-culture.org)
terms* Seth Stevenson on end-user license agreements (aka Terms & Conditions): “What exactly are you agreeing to when you browse around on the Internet?” (slate.com)
* AOL boss Tim Armstrong says “we are one of the biggest disruptors in the industry.” (usatoday.com)
* Want to buy happybirthday.com? That’ll cost you $2 million. (washingtonpost.com)
* Salt Lake Tribune has had a reporter on the polygamy beat since 2006. (cjr.org)
* A cute koala helps reporters forget about fiscal stimulus for a few minutes. (@ZekeJMiller)
* At The Marshall Project, “we will examine the failings of our criminal justice system — but also test promising reforms,” writes Bill Keller. (themarshallproject.org) | (huffingtonpost.com)
* JOBS: Want to do “real journalism” at a Northwest weekly? Check out this opening: (Romenesko Jobs)
* A hipster coffee shop is using a New York Times newspaper stand – but not to sell papers. (@jadmouawad)
end* Locally written movie reviews will no longer run in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. (duanedudek.com)
* Homicide Watch D.C. is looking for a savior. (homicidewatch.org)
* Portland (Maine) Phoenix is sold to Portland Daily Sun, another free newspaper. (mainebiz.biz)
* Airbnb is putting out a quarterly print magazine. (Free story idea: “Ten Most Trashed Home Rentals”) (skift.com)

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