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Daily Archives: December 15, 2014

* Update: “There was no $72 million, no ‘eight figures,’ not even one figure,” reports New York Observer. The teen tells the paper: “I run an investment club at Stuy High which does only simulated trades.”
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million

No he didn’t, says the Leaders Investment Club.

After performing due diligence and talking with Mohammed Islam himself, we have determined that these claims are false and simply been blown up by the media in the interests of sensationalism

- Now scrubbed from the investment club's site

– Scrubbed from the investment club’s site

Jessica Pressler, who wrote the New York profile and is headed to Bloomberg News, tweets: “We saw a bank statement confirming the eight figures, & I’m comfortable with what’s in the piece.”

Mohammed was on the investment club’s team page before this brouhaha — “Mohammed’s goal is to pave a path in the financial industry that will lead him to become a reputable hedge fund manager” — but his name is now missing.

New York magazine now says: “The article portrays the $72 million figure only as a rumor; we changed the headline on the story to reflect more clearly the fact that we did not know the exact figure of how much he had made in trades. The story itself does not specify an amount. However, Mohammed provided bank statements that showed he is worth eight figures; he confirmed on the record that he’s worth eight figures.”

* New York magazine: A teen made $72 million trading stocks (nymag.com)
* Investment club: He did not make $72 million (leadersinvestmentclub.com)
* The teen trader has never confirmed or denied the $72M figure (businessinsider.com)
* Shouldn’t these kids be in school anyway? (@SallyPancakes)

* New The high school student denies making $72 million (cnbc.com)


This story ran in the Lenoir (NC) News-Topic on December 5:stolen

The jeweler bought a full-page ad in the News-Topic a week later:
santaad

I called Garon Mabe and asked about the ad. “I just did it to poke fun of myself,” he said. (He didn’t clear it with his lawyer.) By the way, that’s not Mabe in the Santa mug shot; it’s an image his employee grabbed off Google Images.

* Jeweler accused of buying stolen property (newstopic.net)

The Bucks County Courier Times is getting attacked for this cartoon:

- Cartoon by Chris Britt

– Cartoon by Chris Britt

The people behind a Facebook page called “Standing Up Against BCCT’s [Bucks County Courier Times] Attack on Law Enforcement” says that “it is not our intent to encourage financial harm to any business or the local economy for innocently advertising in this paper …[but] each proprietor will ultimately decide whether they are comfortable supporting the publication of this cartoon, and the subsequent gain or loss of business exercised by their clientele.”

The Bucks County Courier Times community affairs director writes:

Though we don’t know what was in the heart and mind of the award-winning syndicated cartoonist who penned the cartoon, it was selected for publication for thoughtful reflection on that relationship. It in no way was intended to indict the law enforcement community.

If we had recognized prior to publication that the cartoon would have caused unintended offense, our editors would have selected a different one for Sunday’s newspaper. Editing a newspaper is not easy and we don’t always get it right.

I’m told that the police union president has told departments in the newspaper’s circulation area to stop giving information to Courier Times reporters.

* Paper: We wouldn’t have run the cartoon if we knew it was going to offend (buckscountycouriertimes.com)
* “Standing Up Against BCCT’s Attack on Law Enforcement” (facebook.com)
* “People can be sheep around here. That comic was called for.” (facebook.com)

- From Saturday's New York Times

– From Saturday’s New York Times

The above passage appeared in Rob Lieber’s December 13 “Your Money” column. He tells Romenesko readers: “Our basic approach is that as far as possible, we want to respect people’s preferences in how we refer to them. So that’s what we did here. We had taken the last-name-only approach at least once before, most recently in an obit.”

Lacey Mamak, who made the request, describes herself on Twitter as a “community-college librarian, curious individual.”

* Revisiting mortgages with low down payments (nytimes.com)

* What Newsweek’s 1994 interns are up to now. (Franklin Avenue)
* Smart people predict what’s up for journalism in 2015. (More robots?) (niemanlab.org)
* New York Times’ The Upshot “has established itself as an irresistible read and a significant source of traffic,” writes Gabriel Sherman. (nymag.com)
times* Yes, millennials read the New York Times – and other “traditional” publications. (digiday.com)
* The Times labels a commentary by its editor “false.” (facebook.com)
* The Week is killing its comments section. (theweek.com)
* Why a subscription to The Week makes a good Christmas gift. (One reason: It’s “brain sex.”) (nytimes.com)
* News Corp. CEO Robert Thomson calls BuzzFeed “a really strange place.” (qz.com)
* “Ben Smith, [BuzzFeed’s] top editor, told me recently he didn’t expect BuzzFeed to be around in three years, not under its present owners nor in its present form,” writes Michael Wolff. (usatoday.com)
* Gawker’s Nick Denton: “The real secret of [digital media] success is to avoid the herd.” (thedailybeast.com)
* Chris Hughes‘ intentions were good, but he didn’t know what he was doing, says former New Republic senior editor John B. Judis. (cjr.org)
* “Bad journalism, in The Racket’s eyes, was a publication like The New Republic.” (wired.com)
* Last night’s “The Newsroom” season finale was “weird.” (thedailybeast.com) | (observer.com)
* $10M/year man? Brian Williams signs a new NBC News contract. (latimes.com)
* Finally, we have a “Serial” skeptic. (newsworks.org)
* How one student uses elance.com: “I need a working media professional to tell me about your journalism experience in order for me to get some material to write about.” (elance.com) | h/t Peg McNichol