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Daily Archives: January 28, 2015

Star Tribune assistant managing editor/digital Terry Sauer spent days trying to figure that out, too.

He learned over the weekend that some startribune.com users couldn’t post or even view comments on the Minneapolis paper’s site.

A problem with the LiveFyre commenting system? he wondered.images-1

“‘It’s not us,’ they said.”

Sauer and his team did further investigating and discovered that every user having problems with comments was a CenturyLink customer.

“CenturyLink determined over the weekend that they were going to blacklist this website LiveFyre,” says Sauer. “We tried to penetrate CenturyLink for more than a day, trying to get past customer service to no avail.

“There was no contact [person] that could describe why they [LiveFyre] got blacklisted and what the process was to reverse that.”

Finally, Sauer and his team decided all they could do is have Star Tribune users complain to the CenturyLink, the third largest telecommunications company in the U.S. They posted this:

startribune

“We went to bed last night thinking that’s all we could do to move this forward,” says Sauer, “and this morning we wake up and it’s been resolved. We have no idea what caused the problem, and we have no idea what solved it.”

Update: CenturyLink spokesperson Mark Molzen responds to my inquiry:

CenturyLink has researched an issue involving LiveFyre, which resulted in our customers being unable to post comments on some news sites. We were able to determine that a LiveFyre domain was being used in an industry-wide DDOS attack. In order to protect our customers while online from this attack, we temporarily blocked the domain. After ensuring our customers were safe, the issue was resolved late last night and customers should now be able to post comments on these sites.

free

Millennial editor-in-chief Britt Hysen also wants contributor candidates to submit three story proposals. I’ve invited Hysen – aka “The Voice of Gen Y” – to defend her no-pay policy.

Update – Hysen writes in an email:

Our trial period is merely to determine if contributors are a match for our style. No one is asked to come into our office or given a particular topic.

To be considered, all interested parties must submit 3 story proposals, 2 writing samples, and write one original article (500 words) on the topic of their choice within a 1-week period. If approved, contributors receive a login to our site and are free to contribute on their own time. However, there is no guarantee their work will be published if it does not meet our editorial standards.

Paid assignments are reserved for those that meet our client’s needs.

* Millennial mag writing candidates have a one-week unpaid tryout (millennialmagazine.com)

demo

A Romenesko reader who doesn’t want to be named writes:

“Regarding your story about a newsroom using a cardboard person to keep in mind for the demo, it is not the first time I have seen this used.

magid“[Consulting firm] Magid had our station call our target ‘Lisa DeVries’ in the fall of 2012. The reason there are two pictures [of her] is because the first one [above] was considered ‘too trashy’ to match the description of Lisa, so we were given new flyers with the photo of a middle class mom and daughter [right].

“I don’t know if the photos are from Facebook or if they are stock photos, but seeing this Media General story makes me think that Magid’s hands are a part of this creation.” [NYT’s Joyce Cohen notes that it’s a stock photo – JR]

* Earlier: TV station uses cardboard cutout to portray target viewer (jimromenesko.com)

* Andrew Sullivan: “I’ve decided to stop blogging in the near future.” (andrewsullivan.com)
* A county supervisor calls 43-year-old Staunton (VA) News Leader reporter Calvin Trice (left) “boy,” then quickly tries to change the word to “son.” The supervisor, who has apologized to the reporter, says “it certainly came out, and then I went to ‘son.'” (newsleader.com)
* The LA County Board of Supervisors honors veteran AP reporter Linda Deutsch. (laobserved.com)
* Bloomberg Business launches. It’s “a reinvention of how we bring our stories to the world,” says digital editor Josh Topolsky. (capitalnewyork.com) | Daniel Gross: “So few bylines. All those View pieces written by anonymous writers.” (@grossdm)
* “I’m surprised ‘-gate’ has lasted,” says Bob Woodward. (washingtonpost.com)
* The Daily Mail lifts from the suburban Chicago Daily Herald’s story about “the world’s most traveled man.” (daveseminara.com)
* Daryl Cagle: “Hackers succeeded in breaking through to erase data on our hard drives on our servers and bring our [political cartooning] site down.” (darylcagle.com)
* Joe Morgenstern‘s favorite video store is closing. The Wall Street Journal film critic says of Vidiots: “For the almost 20 years I’ve been reviewing movies for the Journal, I’ve cherished the shop, with its all-knowing staff, as an indispensable resource.” (wsj.com)
* The Sun-Times Network isn’t going to save the Chicago media company. (cjr.org)
* JOBS: LSU is looking for a student media director. Wichita Eagle wants a business writer … and more openings. (Romenesko Jobs) muppets
* Google, Yahoo and Facebook top the Media Metrix “most unique visitors” chart for December. (nypost.com)
* CJR’s Brent Cunningham is named managing editor of the Food and Environment Reporting Network. (thefern.org)
* [RIGHT] Oh, no! A meth lab was found near Sesame Street! (h/t Drew Tripp) (heraldonline.com)
* Politico labor reporter Mike Elk is behind the site’s union drive. (freebeacon.com)
* Oh, darn: You’ll never see Shep Smith in a Blizzardmobile. (huffingtonpost.com)