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Daily Archives: February 9, 2015

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Journalist Peter Heimlich, whose father developed the “Heimlich maneuver,” has tried since 2012 to verify the above Heimlich claim by Luke Bryan in People Country magazine. The singer, his managers, and even his mother won’t discuss the story with the skeptical journalist. The magazine isn’t interested in checking the claim, either, says Heimlich.

* Before “Lyin’ Brian” there was “Apparently Lyin’ Bryan” (the-sidebar.com)

(Credit: @katiemacreilly)

(Credit: @katiemacreilly)

Bradley Saacks, a Daily Tar Heel editor, tells Romenesko readers that the paper printed 16,000 copies – 1,000 more than a typical Monday run – then went back to press for another 7,000 copies to meet student (and non-student) demand for the Coach Dean Smith tribute issue.
* Watch as UNC students pick up copies of today’s Daily Tar Heel (vine.co)
* “Daily Tar Heel Design desk fulfilling lifelong dreams of being Newsies today” (@katiemacreilly)
* Here is today’s print edition (scribd.com) | Online edition (dailytarheel.com)
* Buy a copy on eBay for nine or ten bucks (ebay.com)

Bob Stewart is a 40-year-old bartender and former heating/air conditioning service technician who has a new career goal: He wants to be a fulltime newspaper reporter.

Huh?

Philly Daily News intern Bob Stewart (via David Lee Preston)

Philly Daily News intern Bob Stewart (via David Lee Preston)

“One thing’s for sure, I didn’t do this for the money,” says Stewart, who is a spring-semester reporting intern at the Philadelphia Daily News. (He got his first News byline on Friday.)

“In the ten years since I left the Steamfitters [union] I would’ve made at least $700,000 without hustling much. Journalism is my dream. I love telling stories. I love making people laugh, cry, or just say, ‘hmm.’ I want to keep government accountable and power in check.”

Stewart says school counselors and his family encouraged him when he was young to try journalism./CONTINUES Read More

* Brian Williams has given different accounts of the risks he faced while covering the Israel-Hezbollah war. (washingtonpost.com)
williams* David Carr says Williams shouldn’t lose his job because “his transgressions were not a fundamental part of his primary responsibilities.” (nytimes.com)
* An NBC veteran says the anchor’s bluster had always seemed more like a quirk than a time bomb. (politico.com)
* Katie Couric: “Any rumors about me and NBC completely untrue.” (@katiecouric)
* MSNBC’s Mika Brzezinski is “kind of horrified by the pile-on that I’m seeing out there.” (cnn.com)
* Mary McNamara: A journalist can be an engaging talk-show guest without making up stories. (latimes.com)
* “[Williams’] story will play out however it does, almost entirely based on NBC’s financial consideration,” writes Anne Lamott. (facebook.com)
* “NBC Nightly News” ratings are down. (adweek.com)
* Miami Herald’s “Innocents Lost” project wins the $35,000 Selden Ring Award. (usc.edu)
* Capital New York says it’s selling a lot of subscriptions, but won’t give numbers. (digiday.com)
* New York Times has invested in Tina Brown‘s conference business. (usatoday.com)
* Crain’s closes its Washington bureau and cuts five jobs. (robertfeder.com) | (talkingbiznews.com)
* A sportswriter says Radio Shack’s “Trash 80” was “the greatest traveling computer in the history of the American press box.” (startribune.com)
* Las Vegas Review-Journal turns on its comments after “a two-week cooling off period.” (medium.com)
* The “immoral pack of liars and thieves” at the Utah People’s Post news site “make Brian Williams look like Walter Cronkite.” (standard.net)
* Departing NPR ombudsman Edward Schumacher-Matos‘ one regret is that he couldn’t get the radio network to go global. (npr.org)
* A President Scott Walker would not be kind to NPR. (madison.com) | Political pundits say Walker not having a college degree makes him seem like an ordinary guy. (expressmilwaukee.com) paper
* To survive, “newspapers will need a smaller staff with a laser-like focus on local and state news, local sports, local arts and culture. They’ll need to let the other stuff — national, international, technology, national arts — just go.” (davidputney.com)
* Poynter’s Tampa Bay Times will be lucky to get the asking price for its downtown St. Petersburg headquarters. (bizjournals.com)
* Deadline approaching: The Heywood Broun Award ($5,000) contest deadline is February 17. (newsguild.org)
* A Fox News guest crashes a drone during a drone-safety segment. (photographybay.com)
* The Capital Gazette (Annapolis, MD) becomes a morning paper on March 9. (capitalgazette.com)

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* Former UNC basketball coach Dean Smith dies at 83 (espn.com)
* UNC students line up for the Dean Smith Commemorative Issue (jimromenesko.com)

— h/t @mattwilhalme

Kate Glassman Bennett promises her new Politico column, The KGB File, will be “fun, coy, insightful, a tad biting — and smart.” The editor’s memo.

From: Susan Glasser
Date: February 9, 2015 at 6:32:17 AM EST
To: TP-Edit
Subject: a new addition

It’s been a while, but Washington is about to get a great gossip column. Kate Glassman Bennett, a fourth-generation Washingtonian who cut her teeth on gossip in the competitive world of Las Vegas before returning home to DC, will soon launch The KGB File for us at POLITICO. Kate promises a column very much in the spirit of the legendary late Diana McClellan, whose Ear in the Washington Star was the original must read in a company town where the backstage happenings of its congresspeople and Cabinet officers, columnists and chefs have always helped chart the ebbs and flow of power. Kate is a former gossip columnist for the Las Vegas Sun and editor in chief of Vegas Magazine (not to mention classics graduate of St. John’s College); most recently here in DC she has edited Capitol File magazine, Washingtonian Bride & Groom and Washingtonian Mom. For Politico, she promises a great read multiple times a week: “fun, coy, insightful, a tad biting — and smart.”

Stay tuned for more on the launch: Kate starts work with us on Feb. 23.