Archive

Daily Archives: March 12, 2015

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism alumni and former adjunct Mo Krochmal decided to attend Thursday morning’s town hall meeting after reading about Dean Steve Coll’s restructuring plans. (Coll’s memo – with the meeting announcement – was posted on this site Wednesday afternoon.)

“I was there out of concern” for journalism education, says Krochmal, a class of 1995 graduate. Plans to cut j-school staff and reduce enrollment were on the session agenda.
offthe
The journalist got to the meeting about 20 minutes late and found an empty seat in the front row. He took out his phone and a notebook, which got the attention of two nearby journalism school employees. They went over to Krochmal and told him the meeting was off-the-record and he couldn’t take notes or record it.

Krochmal says he was “disappointed” that note-taking wasn’t allowed at a j-school meeting, but he agreed to Coll’s rules so he could stay.

Coll tells me there was confusion about the meeting, which was supposed to be for faculty and staff only. (The dean’s restructuring memo, which gave the meeting location and time, is addressed to “colleagues.”)

Coll writes in an email: “I refer to our quarterly all-staff meetings as ‘town halls.’ They are not public but for full time J-School staff to discuss school updates and plans.

“A note to alumni reporting our intent to hold an all staff meeting gave the unintended impression that this was an open forum. When one or two alums turned up I asked them to follow the ground rules so I could be fully open with my affected colleagues. I regret the confusion but the meeting was fine anyway.”

* “Some people seem to be taking John Schwartz’s retirement tale a bit too personally” (twitter.com)
* Suggestion: Go work for Cablevision-owned Newsday (facebook.com)

Earlier: A 28-year-old Cosmo writer makes almost $80,000 (thebillfold.com)

tips

quote

- From today's Washington Post story on "quotable consultants"

– From today’s Washington Post story on “quotable consultants”

- From today's Washington Post story on HRC and yoga

– From today’s Washington Post story on HRC and yoga

Letter to Romenesko
From DONALD SCHILLER: Thought you might be interested in page 2 of today’s Style section of The Washington Post.

In the middle of the page is the jump of a story from the cover on political consultants who are used to provide quotes for stories they may know little about. The story quotes Joe Trippi, a Democratic consultant who is often called to comment about the Hillary Clinton news of the day and most recently her email habits. He says: “There isn’t a campaign to call about the e-mails, so reporters have to call someone like me or Paul Begala. Hopefully they find someone who is closer to her than I am.”

So, who is quoted in the story above that one? None other than Joe Trippi, who comments to the Reliable Source about Ms. Clinton’s yoga habits (I’m sure this is something he knows a great deal about.)

“It makes her more relatable,” says veteran Democratic strategist Joe Trippi. “Yogi is to 2016 what jogging was to, like, 1990.” When voters saw former presidents Bill Clinton or George W. Bush jogging, he says, “they would think, ‘Hey, I like to jog, too.’ It’s the same thing now with yoga, for women in particular.’ “”

Seems Mr. Trippi’s not such a bad source after all – if you really need one.

* A political vacuum that’s easy to fill (washingtonpost.com)
* Hillary Clinton is most likely practicing Hatha yoga (washingtonpost.com)

Bloomington (IN) Herald-Times copy editor Penny Reid says her biggest concern about appearing on “Jeopardy” was what to wear. She chose a Goodwill sweater and got lots of compliments, “so I guess it was OK.”

Alex Trebek and Penny Reid

Alex Trebek and Penny Reid

Reid did OK on the show, too, winning $24,400 in two appearances that aired this week. (They were taped in Los Angeles in early January.)

“People [at the newspaper] are pretty excited and full of praise and whatnot,” Reid said in a phone interview after winning $22,400 on the show that aired Tuesday and being allowed to return for a second appearance. “It’s very embarrassing.” (The copy editor says she doesn’t like being in the spotlight.)

Reid took second place on Wednesday’s show, and added $2,000 to her winnings.

“I was terrified the whole time just because of the pressure, mostly that I put on myself,” she told her newspaper in a story that’s behind a paywall. “I was shaking the whole time. I was a little worried that I might swear on camera. But once you’re there, you kind of get into a professional mode. So you don’t.”

Her plans for the money: “I’m going to take a slightly less backpacking type of trip, and more of hotel trip.” She’s going to London this summer, then Germany to visit a brother.

Friends have encouraged her to buy a new car with her winnings, but Reid says she wants to see how long her 1999 Subaru can stay on the road.

The 1987 Indiana University j-school grad, who has been a copy editor at the Bloomington paper for 25 years, says she still loves her job.

“It’s kind of a dream to get paid to read the paper,” she tells me, adding: “I’d like to say I knew the [“Jeopardy”] answers from reading the paper, but most of them I probably learned in high school.”/CONTINUES Read More

* Muhammad Ali urges Iran to release Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian. (washingtonpost.com)
* Someone tried to burn down the Rio Grande Sun, a weekly with “a strong editorial stance against political corruption.” (santafenewmexican.com) | (santafenewmexican.com) || “We know there is a portion of the population that doesn’t like what we do here.” (facebook.com)blade
* WWD print edition goes from daily to weekly. (wwd.com)
* No surprises, please: Editorial staffers should be told about their company’s finances. (niemanlab.org)
* [RIGHT] “Oh, sure, we can fit that ad on the page.” From today’s Toledo Blade, via Bob Seybold.
* Baltimore public radio station WYPR trades underwriting for air time. (citypaper.com) | NPR underwriting guidelines. (npr.org)
* “I think Hollywood roots for Entertainment Weekly’s success,” says editorial director Jess Cagle. (thewrap.com)
* The New York Times and the Newspaper Guild settle their dispute over layoffs; fourteen journalists get financial packages. (nyguild.org)
* Why aspiring journalists should go to j-school: “It can be a power boost that propels you into the industry.” (businessinsider.com)
* A Denver Post editor on clicking to promote “real” news: “You have an astonishing, in fact galling, amount of influence over what kind of media will be produced tomorrow, next week and next month.” (facebook.com)
* Work here: The Association of Washington Cities is looking for a communications coordinator. (Romenesko Jobs)
* Google moves company statements up in news search results. (reuters.com)
* A 28-year-old Cosmo writer’s financial goal: “$80,000 [a year], because it’s, like, slightly more than what I make now, but not, like, tryna be greedy.” (thebillfold.com)
* [SPONSORED] Apply for the $10,000 Osborn Elliott Prize for Excellence in Journalism on Asia. (Asia Society)
* Gannett announces a 10% dividend boost. (gannett.com | h/t Jim Hopkins)
* Interested in placing a job ad or sponsored post on Romenesko? Contact Tom Kwas and he’ll get on the site.
* Send news tips, link suggestions, memos, reports of comment spam, and typo alerts to jim@jimromenesko.com (I’ll protect you, of course – unless you do want a h/t.)
* Romenesko on Facebook | Romenesko on Twitter | Romenesko on Instagram | Romenesko on Pinterest | Romenesko on Flipboard |