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Daily Archives: April 13, 2015

- Barbara Bester - Tom Stern wedding

– Barbara Bester – Tom Stern wedding announcement

Note the band “Butthole Surfers” makes it into Times here. When I lived in Austin in the 90s, the American-Statesman always and famously referred to the band as the “BH Surfers.” – a Romenesko reader who doesn’t want to be named

That’s confirmed by Austin American-Statesman managing editor John Bridges, who browsed through his paper’s index this afternoon and found the band’s name as either BH Surfers or B.H. Surfers in stories from the late 1980s and early 1990s. Did the Statesman have a prudish editor who banned Butthole? I ask.
buffhole
No, says Bridges, “everybody was pretty conservative and cautious back then.”

Former Statesman music writer Michael Corcoran writes in an email: “I started at the Statesman in 1995 and was able to use band’s full name, but I remember earlier in their career, the Statesman used BH Surfers. During my time at AAS, we did have to shorten Nashville Pussy to Nashville P and the Yuppie Pricks were Yuppie P.”

What band names did your news organization refuse to publish? Post in comments or send me an email.

UPDATE:

Andy Viner Seiler writes: “In the 1980s, I was an entertainment reporter for The Home News in New Brunswick, NJ. The Butthole Surfers played regularly at Trenton’s legendary, long-defunct City Gardens. Our calendar compiler always billed them as Bud Whole Surfers. I never knew if she was mishearing the name or if the new name was deliberate. I got such a kick out of seeing it each time, I never even dared jeopardize it by asking her, though she was sitting right next to me.”

The band was the “Buttonhole Surfers” in the old Los Angeles Herald Examiner, writes Kevin Allman.

“The Cincinnati Post used to call the Ass Ponys the Burro Ponys,” writes David Milstead.

“As I recall, the Rocky’s music listings for shows by the Fornicators called them the 4 Nikators,” writes Rob Reuteman.

A Romenesko reader from a Cincinnati publication writes: “I’d always heard that Ben Bradlee’s proximity to the Kennedy legend precluded publishing the Dead Kennedys name in the Washington Post for some years. Supposedly ‘the Dks’ was used.” I’ve asked a few Post staffers about that. Two veterans tell me that’s news to them. See my post in comments for more.

* Earlier: New York Times won’t print “WTF” (jimromenesko.com)




hudson

Why would a luxury magazine make its Instagram account private?

In the case of HudsonMOD, it’s because freelance writers and photographers were using the comments section to ask for money that they’re owed. (Publisher Shannon Steitz doesn’t return their calls or reply to their emails.)

On March 13, I wrote about journalist Terry Ward getting a cease-and-desist order from the magazine after tweeting about her attempt to collect the $3,460 she’s owed. After that story was posted, I heard from other writers and photographers who had HudsonMOD collection problems.

“I would warn anyone not to get involved with this company on any level,” wrote an art director who had to get a court judgment against the magazine. A photographer told me: “I did two jobs for them. They paid the first one $1000.00 but the second never. …it was $800.”

Last week I heard again from cease-and-desist recipient Ward, who has hired an attorney to go after Steitz. He hasn’t had much luck, though. Here’s what the lawyer told the writer on Friday:

I spoke with Shannon from MOD Media LLC this afternoon. She claims that you harassed her individually through social media and that she [has] spoken to multiple attorneys who advised her to take a no-pay position in regards to her outstanding debt with you. She also indicated that if a lawsuit is instituted, she would file a counterclaim for harassment.

So the publisher, allegedly at the advice of lawyers, is taking a no-pay position because a writer is using every means possible to collect money she’s owed? Sounds like it.

I called Steitz this morning to see what she had to say, but she wasn’t in the office and the secretary wouldn’t give me a cell number. I then called Steitz’s lawyer, who said he remembered me from our brief March conversation. He said “no comment” when I asked about money owed to freelancers, and then hung up on me.

Please email me if you’ve had recent dealings with HudsonMOD and its publisher.

* March 13: HudsonMOD sends cease-and-desist to freelancer (jimromenesko.com)
* HudsonMOD on Instagram




Top of the Tennessean's front page, April 12

Top of the Tennessean’s front page, April 12

“It feels like the Tennessean brass had a look at the attention the Indianapolis Star got a few weeks ago [after it ran its “FIX THIS NOW” front-page editorial] and said,fullpage ‘huh, we can do that,'” writes Nashville Scene’s Steve Cavendish.

Yes, says Tennessean opinion engagement editor David Plazas, yesterday’s front page editorial was inspired by the Indy Star. “That was certainly in my mind, and I think that was in the mind of the designers, too,” he says, adding that “this was not our first front page editorial since I’ve been here.”

Reaction has been “overwhelmingly positive,” says Plazas. “There has been some negative reaction – about 5% to 10% – people who say it’s an overly liberal stance, or that it should be on the editorial page.”

What about the local alt-weekly accusing the Gannett daily of grandstanding? “I’m pleased that they’re reading our paper; I’m pleased they’re commenting.”

(I doubt he saw The Tennessean’s front page, but Larry King tweeted shortly after midnight Monday: “Newspapers that editorialize on the front page are not newspapers…”)

* We are not that vulgar term you called us, Senator (tennessean.com)
* The Tennessean goes grandstanding (nashvillescene.com)
* PDF of Sunday’s Tennessean front page (newseum.org)

New: Read the comments from my Facebook friends and subscribers

* A University of Rhode Island student newspaper story gets a therapy dog kicked off campus. The editor says “I’m trying not to regret running this piece.” (collegemediamatters.com)
* Warning: You’ll lose your Twitter account if you repeatedly broadcast TV shows over Periscope. (mashable.com)newsweek
* [RIGHT] “I have no memory of when I wrote the letter,” says novelist Stacia Brown. “I have no memory of what prompted me to write the letter” at age 17. (newsweek.com)
* Print book sales were up 3% in the first quarter of 2015. (publishersweekly.com)
* NPR wants its name off Latino USA’s report on the Chicago mayoral election; it “does not meet NPR’s editorial standards.” (npr.org)
* Garry Trudeau: “What free speech absolutists have failed to acknowledge is that because one has the right to offend a group does not mean that one must.” (theatlantic.com)
* How a freelancer survived without home Internet. (esquire.com)
* Fars news agency reports Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian is being accused of passing on sensitive information about Iran. (washingtonpost.com) | “Absurd” charges. (cnn.com)
* Twenty tech journalists talk about the state of news in part two of the Shorenstein Center’s Riptide project. (digitalriptide.org)
* The Anderson Valley Advertiser is described by its editor as “the hometown paper for people without a hometown.” (newsweek.com)
catch* Chris Hansen wants to catch more predators. He’s using Kickstarter to finance his online show, “Hansen vs. Predator.” (adweek.com)
* A small town in Indiana (15K population) still has two dailies. (aljazeera.com)