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Daily Archives: February 11, 2014

From Craigslist (of course):
dog

* Great 2nd job for a writer/editor (craigslist.org via J. Ford Huffman)
* “I walked dogs while I was a copy editor at the WashPost. It WAS handy extra money” (facebook.com)

Mike Pesca is leaving NPR after a decade to work for Slate. In his farewell memo to public radio colleagues, the sports reporter jokes:

I had a choice. Quit now or work five more years to qualify for the iPhone 5 adapter. It was a tough decision, not made any easier by the fact that NPR owns my iPhone, so if I left I’d have to surrender that anyway.

But seriously…. “I have always wanted NPR to be a weeee bit more ambitious or daring, to be willing to take risks outside our comfort zone. So I’m leaving to do a daily podcast about things other than sports, though sometimes sports, because I like sports.”

Read his memo after the jump. Read More

“‘Vikes’ wouldn’t quite fit,” tweets @chris_steller, who came up with this candy heart after the Star Tribune headline was posted here.
butthed

* Minneapolis Star Tribune gets Headline of the Day honors (jimromenesko.com)

icon

We’re still waiting to see what headline they come up with. | Update: “Child star Shirley Temple dies at age 85” (h/t Patricia Witkin)


lougrant“Cursing, yelling and belittling others was commonplace in the [Portland KATU] newsroom by management,” former reporter Thom Jensen’s lawsuit claims.

— “WHAT? I AM SHOCKED” – @megansarahj
— “Who ever heard of that kind of behavior in a newsroom?” – @sirosenbaum

* Television stations sued over overtime (registerguard.com) | (oregonlive.com)

Update — “TTAC.com has apologized, pulled the original story they posted and replaced it with an edited version that credits and links to us,” Nick Bunkley writes in an email.

* “We are deeply sorry for this,” tweets TTAC (@TTAC)

——

* February 10: Clouds on the auto sales horizon (autonews.com)
* February 11: Auto inventories soar past 100 days’ supply (thetruthaboutcars.com)

On Monday, I posted a Dow Jones editor’s memo telling staffers that working at home because of bad weather “should NOT be the first option or the preference.”
storm
This morning, the Dow Jones union tells members that “if you decide to stay home because you believe it is too dangerous to commute (but roads or transit have not been officially closed), you may be docked for the day’s pay or forced to use a vacation day or personal day, BUT the choice to remain home is yours AND you must not be disciplined for making that decision.”

The union executive director’s memo:

From: Tim Martell
Sent: Tuesday, February 11, 2014 11:04 AM
To: ‘Your Union: IAPE 1096’
Subject: Stormy Weather

Over the last couple of weeks, IAPE members from Atlanta to Allagash have reached out to the Union wondering about storm days at Dow Jones. And since, just yesterday, a manager in New York decided to remind Americas Copy Desk staff about the perils of working from home during stormy weather, we thought it might be helpful if we again explain the REAL policy regarding your obligations during severe weather events.

Since 1997, IAPE-represented employees have been protected by a negotiated agreement concerning “Severe Weather Emergencies.” The document explaining the terms of that agreement is posted on the IAPE website.

In short, if a state of emergency is declared AND the roads or transit system you use to get to work have been closed by government order, you are not expected to come to work AND you are still entitled to pay for the day./CONTINUES Read More

- From Indy Star's video.

– From Indy Star’s video.

* Juneau Empire reporter Jennifer Canfield is fired after refusing to set up a meeting between her publisher and a legislator. (ktoo.org)
* Indianapolis Star staffers read mean comments from readers. (indystar.com) | (Inspired by Jimmy Kimmel‘s celebs-read-mean-tweets regular feature?)
* Ad Age: “Are we going to see the kind of splashy packaging Josh Tyrangiel brought to Businessweek reflected on Bloomberg TV?” CEO: “The answer is yes. We’re looking to bring that kind of storytelling to the TV platform.” (adage.com)
* An element of Bill Steigerwald‘s plan to save newspapers: “Web site first, paper second. Every day. All scoops appear on the web first.” (steigerwaldpost.com) | Brendan Nyhan on the benefits of “the staid local newspaper.” (cjr.org)
* How the Star-Ledger came to regret its Chris Christie endorsement. (mediamatters.org)
* James Taranto‘s Monday WSJ column about rape is blasted on Twitter. (huffingtonpost.com)
keller* Reactions to the end of the Bill Keller era at the New York Times. (newspaperalum.com) | (usatoday.com)
* Veteran Philly media reporter: “I think that they’re putting out kind of a bland product” at the Inquirer. (phillymag.com)
* Capital New York tweaks its pricing and now offers a Media Pro-only subscription for $4,000. (adweek.com)
* Self-plagiarism alert! Much of Rick Reilly‘s latest column is lifted from one of his 2009 columns. (deadspin.com)
* An “as such” lesson from NYT standards editor Phil Corbett. (nytimes.com)
* Secret, says Choire Sicha, is “a fascinating experiment, and I’m curious about where it will go.” (He’s deleted the app.) (theawl.com)