Jonesboro (AR) Police Chief Mike Yates will be suspended for 30 days without pay for posting vicious comments about former Jonesboro Sun crime reporter Sunshine Crump.

Chief Mike Yates

Chief Mike Yates

The city’s mayor also ordered Yates to apologize to both the Sun and Crump, who quit on Monday after months of intimidation by the chief. (“I do not feel safe here,” she wrote in her resignation letter.)

The AP reports:

The mayor gave Yates a written warning that he’d be immediately fired if he again used social media to “imply threats, actions or consequences” tied to his authority as chief.

Sun publisher David Mosesso calls the punishment “a slap on the wrist” and tells me that “we don’t think he’s fit to continue in his role as police chief. But we have to accept it and hopefully we’ll all move on.”

Mosesso adds: “I’m writing an editorial [about the suspension] right now. I’m not a writer, but I have opinions [about this] and I represent the newspaper.” (His piece runs in Sunday’s paper – behind a paywall – and he promises to share it with Romenesko readers on Monday.)

Will Crump return to the paper now that the chief has been slapped?

“We don’t know,” says Mosesso. “I talked to her today, and we’re going to talk again on Monday.” The publisher says another newspaper in his chain has offered to hire the reporter if she doesn’t return to the Sun, “but it’s 200 miles away.”

Yates wrote on Facebook that Crump was a “smelly” and unscrupulous reporter” and that dealing with her “is like trying to pick up a dog turd by the ‘clean end.’” The attacks started after Crump’s reporting resulted in the chief losing a teaching job.

* Jonesboro mayor to suspend police chief for 30 days (arktimes.com)
* Earlier: Reporter resigns over police chief’s ugly comments on Facebook (jimromenesko.com)
* Update: Read comments from my Facebook friends and subscribers (facebook.com)



Philadelphia Phillies slugger and Subway pitchman Ryan Howard spent some time with Little League World Series players Thursday as part of a promotion arranged by the sandwich chain. The event was well-covered, but one Subway publicist didn’t think his client got enough exposure and advised sports journalists to edit their stories to include Subway’s name.

Here’s publicist (and former CBS Sports staffer) Michael Pernal‘s email to Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia’s Sarah Baicker:
edit

Baicker tells me: “As soon as I saw the subject line and realized it was from the PR rep, my jaw dropped. I thought, ‘Seriously? Edit Needed?’subhoward You’ve got to be kidding.’ … I mean, wasn’t the fact that Howard was wearing a Subway jersey and carrying a sandwich with him when he did his [broadcast] interview enough?”

She wasn’t the only Philadelphia reporter to hear from the publicist; the Inquirer’s Matt Breen and the Daily News’ Stephanie Farr were also advised to add Subway to their stories. “We are the free press not your press,” Farr tweeted to Subway. She added: “The #LLWS is about the kids, not your sandwiches. The way your PR rep is operating is #shameful.”

I’ve invited Pernal to comment.

* Subway emails writers to include sponsor in Little League World Series stories (nesn.com)


Chloe Angyal says of Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert: “When it comes to gender and race,colbert their guest rosters more closely resemble a GOP national convention than they do the liberal vision of a diverse and equitable.” Of Colbert’s most recent 45 guests, 73% were men and 89% were white. For Stewart it was 62% male and 68% white.

In short, Colbert and, to a lesser extent Stewart, are sending the message that the most credible, interesting and relevant people out there – the people viewers should hear from and know about – are almost all white and male.

* Where are the women on the Colbert and Stewart shows? (reuters.com)

A letter to The Economist
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The person handling The Economist’s Instagram account writes: “Every week, we receive fascinating and insightful letters from around the world. On August 13th we were sent a letter from a reader whose failure to renew their subscription had inadvertently led to health benefits. We have shared the correspondence here. (Please note, we would not suggest cancelling your Economist subscription as a fix for any ailments you may suffer from, unless a qualified doctor recommends.)”

* A health care company has no right to review the Boston Globe’s reporting before its story is published this weekend, says a judge. (bostonglobe.com)
* Washington Post to President Obama: Turn your words about journalists into deeds and leave James Risen alone. (washingtonpost.com)
* I’m no spy, says New York Times reporter Matthew Rosenberg. (@mrosenbergNYT)
* An early look at The New Yorker’s Ferguson cover. (newyorker.com)nyer
* Afghan presidential candidates say they’ll reverse Rosenberg’s expulsion. (nytimes.com)
* MediaNama has fun with the Reuters content acquisition chief’s idiocy. (medianama.com)
* Philadelphia Daily News reporters Barbara Laker and Wendy Ruderman say investigators are using the Philadelphia Inquirer to tarnish their reputation. (philly.com)
* “The tablet magazine has been flawed from the start.” (digiday.com)
* A magazine ad salesman is threatened with a felony extortion charge for using hard-sell tactics. (jsonline.com)
* Leo York of Albuquerque is outed as one of the “media assholes” in Ferguson. (gawker.com)
* Lisa DePaulo: “I always tell profile subjects: The more time you give me, the less time I’ll spend calling everyone you ever knew.” (jacklimpert.com)
* High Times didn’t publish its 40th anniversary issue in June because that’s a lousy sales month; it’ll come out in November instead. (thecannibist.co)
* New York Times launches a free daily mini-crossword puzzle. (nytco.com)elvis
* The late Rolling Stone writer Charles M. Young helped start a support group for guys addicted to alcohol and Elvis. (rollingstone.com)
* Robert Sherrill – “an inexhaustible loner of Washington journalism” – dies at 89. (washingtonpost.com)
* He didn’t read Clay Shirky‘s death-of-print memo? “We’re printing [even more] papers because the world is making us print papers.” (chicagobusiness.com)
* Vogue’s Anna Wintour is said to have a $200,000 clothing allowance. (nymag.com)
* Must Not-See TV: In a new WE tv reality show, people have sex in a box and then discuss what happened. (washingtonpost.com)


(Photo: Robert Cohen)

(Photo: Robert Cohen)

Former St. Louis Post-Dispatch employees set up a Paypal account this week and raised more than $700 to treat former colleagues.

“Newspapers are like family – dysfunctional, whip-smart, dirty-minded families,” says Dawn Fallik, who organized the fund. “Even when you leave, you still love each other. We knew this was a really hard time for the P-D and all the St. Louis media. More than 20 former staffers donated … and we reached out to Amy’s Corner Bakeshop because we knew she’d been a former staffer as well.”

Former Post-Dispatch copy editor Amy Verkamp-McArthy was hired to bake 75 cupcakes – decorated with gas masks and caution signs – and platters of cookies, brownies, lemon bars and other treats. The former P-D staffers raised enough money for another batch of baked goods to be delivered next week.

* Robert Cohen: Post-Dispatch alums sent us cupcakes (@kodacohen)


- Credit: Gary McCoy

– Credit: Gary McCoy

The Columbia (MO) Daily Tribune is getting criticized for running this Gary McCoy syndicated cartoon on Wednesday, next to a Rich Lowry column headlined “Overly aggressive police are being provoked.”

Managing editor Jim Robertson tells Romenesko readers:

I admit I didn’t anticipate the reaction. I’m responding to complaints, most of which have come through the Twitter universe, by asking them to consider the context. On three of the preceding four days our editorial page featured local cartoons about the Michael Brown tragedy, the militarization of the police response and a likeness of Lady Justice with six bullet wounds.

The editorial cartoon yesterday accompanied a Rich Lowry column about the unfortunate presence of looters and how that is not a legitimate form of protest. Provocative yes. Racist? Certainly not in intent.

* Missouri paper under fire for cartoon about Ferguson protesters (storify.com)
* PDF of Wednesday’s Tribune editorial page (columbiatribune.com)

Time Inc. chief content officer Norman Pearlstine says it’s not a big deal that SI.com writers are rated on how “beneficial” they are to advertisers. He tells Gabriel Sherman:

For me, it’s not this great example of an issue related to church and state. I think it’s not a big deal.newcontent I don’t think it has anything to do with editorial independence and editorial integrity. But if I’m the Guild and I think I can leak a document to get reporters’ attention, this was a nice one to leak. …

This was something I learned about on Gawker. Had it gone past me, I would have said, “What the fuck is this?”

* SI.com spreadsheet not a big deal, says Time Inc. content chief (nymag.com)