Architecture critic Goldberger leaves New Yorker for Vanity Fair

Paul Goldberger

Paul Goldberger, who left the New York Times to become New Yorker architecture critic in 1997, is now joining Vanity Fair. “This is an appointment that thrills me profoundly,” VF editor Graydon Carter says in a release. “Paul is about as gifted a commentator on architecture, urban planning, and design as anyone you’re going to find these days—in other words, he’s just a brilliant writer.” || New York Observer: The end of architecture criticism at The New Yorker? || The press release is after the jump.


GRAYDON CARTER NAMES PAUL GOLDBERGER CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
Will Write About Architecture and Design for Vanity Fair

New York, NY—April 2, 2012: Graydon Carter has announced that Pulitzer Prize–winning architecture critic Paul Goldberger will become a contributing editor to Vanity Fair.

“This is an appointment that thrills me profoundly,” Carter said. “Paul is about as gifted a commentator on architecture, urban planning, and design as anyone you’re going to find these days—in other words, he’s just a brilliant writer.”

Paul Goldberger was the architecture critic for The New Yorker since 1997. He also holds the Joseph Urban Chair in Design and Architecture at the New School in New York City. He was formerly dean of the Parsons school of design. He began his career at The New York Times and won the Pulitzer Prize for distinguished criticism, the highest award in journalism, for his work there.

Goldberger is the author of several books, including Why Architecture Matters, published in 2009 by Yale University Press; Building Up and Tearing Down: Reflections on the Age of Architecture, a collection of his architecture essays published in 2009 by Monacelli Press, and Christo and Jeanne-Claude, published in 2010 by Taschen. He is at work on a full-length biography of the architect Frank Gehry, to be published by Alfred A. Knopf.

A graduate of Yale University, Goldberger has been awarded honorary doctoral degrees by Pratt Institute, the University of Miami, Kenyon College, the College of Creative Studies, and the New York School of Interior Design for his work as a critic and cultural commentator on design. He appears frequently in films and on television to discuss art, architecture, and cities, and recently served as host of a PBS program on the architect Benjamin Latrobe. He has also served as a special consultant and adviser on architecture-and-planning matters to several major cultural and educational institutions, including the Morgan Library in New York, the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, the New York Public Library, the Glenstone Foundation and Cornell and Harvard Universities.

He resides in New York City with his wife, Susan Solomon, who is the CEO of the New York Stem Cell Foundation.

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