The iPad becomes the evening newspaper

The iPad and other tablets may prompt newspapers to start changing when they update content, reports Roger Fidler, program director of digital publishing at Reynolds Journalism Institute. Here’s why: His study found that tablet owners tend to use their devices more frequently at home after 5:00 p.m.

Fidler — the man who predicted an iPad-like device in 1994 — also found:

* Compared to a printed newspaper, 60% of large media tablet users and 50% of smartphone owners consider their experience consuming news on their mobile device to be better.

* Compared to watching news on TV, 63% of large media tablet owners and 46% of smartphone users favored watching on their mobile devices.

* Compared to listening to news on the radio, 73% of large media tablets said their experience was better, 59% of smartphone users favored their phone.

Read the release on Fidler’s study after the jump.

Could Tablets Change the Afternoon News Cycle?

RJI Survey finds evening news readership favored, differences between smartphone and tablets users

COLUMBIA, Mo. – For news organizations, the Apple iPad and comparable tablets appear to be becoming a real alternative to printing presses, televisions and radios, but they may also start changing when newspapers update content. As part of the third installment from the Reynolds Journalism Institute’s Media News Consumption Survey, researchers confirmed that owners of large media tablets tend to spend more time consuming news than those who don’t own them and they do so while relaxing at home after work.

“While more then half of tablet users still subscribe to a printed news media, it’s interesting to find that tablet owners tend to use their devices more frequently at home after 5:00 p.m.,” said Roger Fidler, program director of digital publishing at RJI. “Evenings have historically been the location and time for reading evening newspapers and watching news.”

The survey also found that respondents are starting to heavily favor getting their news from mobile devices:

* Compared to a printed newspaper, 60% of large media tablet users and 50% of smartphone owners consider their experience consuming news on their mobile device to be better.

* Compared to watching news on TV, 63% of large media tablet owners and 46 percent of smartphone users favored watching on their mobile devices.

* Compared to listening to news on the radio, 73% of large media tablets said their experience was better, 59% of smartphone users favored their phone.

Survey respondents favoring smartphones for news are somewhat more likely to download news apps, compared to tablet users. However, tablet owners who have downloaded news apps tend to use more news apps than those who own smartphones. CNN’s news app ranked first with both smartphone and large media tablet news consumers. The New York Times app ranked in second place with large media tablet news consumers and tied for second place with the Fox Cable News app with smartphone news consumers.

For part 1 of this survey, “Who owns mobile media devices in the U.S.?” and part 2, “What are owners doing with their mobile media devices?” visit RJIonline.org.

Fidler and Ken Fleming, associate director of research at RJI, conducted the 2012 Media News Consumption Survey using RJI’s Center for Advanced Social Research (CASR). The staff of CASR interviewed more than 1,000 individuals randomly selected from phone number lists between January 17 and March 25, 2012. More than half of the participants used a cell phone. The questionnaire was designed to gather information from both users and non-users of mobile media devices; however more than half of the questions were designed specifically for device owners.

* Young tablet owners are more willing to pay for news (paidContent.org)


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