Morning Report for September 19, 2014

bylines
* New York Times is “home to some of the most quirky and golden names in American journalism.” (nytimes.com)
* “If you survived high school, you can survive Twitter,” says Jack Shafer. “Just remember to wear some light armor.” (reuters.com)
* Time Inc. contract talks break down. (gawker.com)
* Roz Chast: “It seems very strange” there aren’t more women on the National Book Award nonfiction longlist. (wsj.com)
* How Gene Weingarten got the ad department to withdraw its proposal for a nothing-but-swimming pools issue of Miami Herald’s Sunday magazine: He said the main story would be about drownings. (washingtonpost.com)
* New York Times to Turkish authorities and media: Stop the campaign against our reporter in Turkey. (todayszaman.com) | (nytco.com)
* AFP will no longer send reporters to rebel-held territories in Syria. (matthewkeys.net)
* Tech enthusiast Robert Scoble visits Samsung on “Apple Day” and points out: “I never was derided for pulling out my iPhone and shooting photos.” (facebook.com)
* “I’m completely unashamed in the respect that I’m a reader pleaser,” says Harper’s Bazaar editor Glenda Bailey.spy “I’m all about the reader.” (observer.com)
* How Dig Boston got its story about the city’s secret surveillance program. (altweeklies.com)
* Facebook tweaks its news feed formula after stumbling on the Ferguson story. (wsj.com)
* A judge blocks the Montgomery Advertiser from publishing a utility’s gas line safety plans, which the paper got via an open records request. (AP via al.com)
* A Chicago press critic refuses to sign an anti-Rush Limbaugh petition. “The Democratic Party shouldn’t be in the business of trying to shut people up,” writes Michael Miner. (chicagoreader.com)

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